Top 21 what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil

Below is the best information and knowledge about what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil compiled and compiled by the hkfindall.com team, along with other related topics such as:: coffee grounds as fertilizer for houseplants, which plants like used coffee grounds, used coffee grounds for plants, coffee grounds for plants and flowers, unused coffee grounds for plants, coffee grounds in the vegetable garden, coffee grounds garden pests, are coffee grounds good for grass.

what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil

Image for keyword: what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil

The most popular articles about what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil

What You Should Know About Used Coffee Grounds For Plants

  • Author: www.21oak.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (34418 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about What You Should Know About Used Coffee Grounds For Plants Coffee grounds contain several essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus, along with micronutrients — all of which make …

  • Match the search results: Coffee grounds contain several essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus, along with micronutrients — all of which make using coffee grounds for plant mulch a great idea. The amount of nutrients in each batch of coffee grounds varies, but ultimately, coffee grounds can be used …

  • Quote from the source:

How to Use Coffee Grounds in Your Garden – The Spruce

  • Author: www.thespruce.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (36670 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Use Coffee Grounds in Your Garden – The Spruce Coffee grounds are approximately 1.45 percent nitrogen. They also contain magnesium, calcium, potassium, and other trace minerals. Other green …

  • Match the search results:
    Add coffee grounds directly to the soil in your garden. You can scratch it into the top couple inches of soil, or just sprinkle the grounds on top and leave it alone. In smaller amounts, especially when mixed with dry materials, coffee grounds will give up their nitrogen. Used coffee grounds are ac…

  • Quote from the source:

Are coffee grounds good for plants? Experts share their advice

  • Author: www.homesandgardens.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (3367 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Are coffee grounds good for plants? Experts share their advice ‘Coffee grounds have a varied amount of essential nutrients in each batch, but they all contain nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus alongside …

  • Match the search results: ‘Plants such as carrots, azaleas, camellias, hydrangeas and roses would appreciate a nice boost from coffee grounds. However, tomatoes do not like the grounds.’

  • Quote from the source:

16 Creative Uses for Used Coffee Grounds – Healthline

  • Author: www.healthline.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (16805 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about 16 Creative Uses for Used Coffee Grounds – Healthline Coffee grounds contain several key minerals for plant growth — nitrogen, calcium, potassium, iron, phosphorus, magnesium and chromium ( 1Trusted …

  • Match the search results: You can even keep coffee grounds by the sink and use them to scrub your hands after chopping garlic or onions. The grounds will help remove the smell from your hands.

  • Quote from the source:

Whatever You Do, Don’t Put Coffee Grounds in Your Garden

  • Author: www.discovery.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (1835 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Whatever You Do, Don’t Put Coffee Grounds in Your Garden Coffee grounds are highly acidic, they note, so they should be reserved for acid-loving plants like azaleas and blueberries. And if your soil is already high in …

  • Match the search results: That’s why adding coffee grounds to your garden is the last thing you want to do. A 2016 study in the journal Urban Forestry & Urban Greening said it all in the title: "Applying spent coffee grounds directly to urban agriculture soils greatly reduces plant growth." That was true even w…

  • Quote from the source:

Using Coffee Grounds In The Garden | HGTV

  • Author: www.hgtv.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (34155 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Using Coffee Grounds In The Garden | HGTV Spread on planting beds like mulch, grounds are said to repel cats, fertilize soil, kill slugs and keep weeds at bay. A coffee mulch is also rumored to beckon …

  • Match the search results: Coffee grounds inhibit the growth of some plants, including geranium, asparagus fern, Chinese mustard and Italian ryegrass. Conversely, grounds (used as mulch and compost) improve yields of soybeans and cabbage. In other cases, grounds inhibit seed germination of clovers (red and white) and alfalfa….

  • Quote from the source:

Coffee Grounds and Composting | OSU Extension Service

  • Author: extension.oregonstate.edu

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (15226 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Coffee Grounds and Composting | OSU Extension Service Coffee grounds are an excellent nitrogen source for composting. They have a C/N ratio of 20-to-1. In informal trials with OSU/Lane County …

  • Match the search results: If you are incorporating coffee grounds directly into the soil, add a nitrogen fertilizer at the same time. Coffee grounds encourage the growth of microorganisms in the soil, which use nitrogen for their growth and reproduction. While the coffee grounds are being broken down by the microorganisms, t…

  • Quote from the source:

What Plants Like Coffee Grounds?

  • Author: coffeeaffection.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (16162 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about What Plants Like Coffee Grounds? Coffee grounds provide nitrogen, a classic ingredient in most fertilizers. Plants need nitrogen to grow. Coffee grounds are also popular with …

  • Match the search results: Using coffee grounds in your garden has its share of pros and cons, and we hope this article has answered your questions. Coffee can impede plant growth, but it may also keep away certain pests or alter the pH of your soil in a useful way. Plants like carrots, roses, cabbage, and hydrangeas like cof…

  • Quote from the source:

Are Coffee Grounds Good for your Garden?

  • Author: oxfordgardendesign.co.uk

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (34484 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Are Coffee Grounds Good for your Garden? Adding coffee grounds directly to the soil as a fertiliser can be a good option. Coffee grounds are rich in nutrients, especially nitrogen. They also have some …

  • Match the search results: A different approach is required with coffee grounds. A thick layer of mulch with coffee grounds will lead to caffeine-rich soil and stunted plants. Instead, consider mixing coffee grounds with other organic material. Another possibility is to add a thin layer of coffee grounds on the soil, and then…

  • Quote from the source:

5 Reasons To NEVER Use Coffee Grounds In Your Garden

  • Author: www.ruralsprout.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (8369 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about 5 Reasons To NEVER Use Coffee Grounds In Your Garden We are advised to put them in the garden for perky plants and bright blue azaleas. Coffee grounds ward off slugs! Put coffee grounds in your …

  • Match the search results: We are advised to put them in the garden for perky plants and bright blue azaleas. Coffee grounds ward off slugs! Put coffee grounds in your compost for healthy soil and earthworms! Grow HUGE plants with coffee grounds! Some even suggest using coffee as a mulch.

  • Quote from the source:

Using Coffee Grounds in the Garden

  • Author: www.sgaonline.org.au

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (36733 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Using Coffee Grounds in the Garden Spent coffee grounds can possibly provide similar plant growth and soil property benefits as other organic amendments such as manures, biochar, …

  • Match the search results: 1. Lucas, J.W. 2010. Happy, Hunting Grounds. Viewed 6th April 2014. http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1501/ – b
    2. Tokimoto, T., N. Kawasaki, T. Nakamura, J. Akutagawa and S. Tanada. 2005. Removal of lead ions in drinking water by coffee grounds as vegetable biomass. Journal of Coll…

  • Quote from the source:

Coffee Compost – Fact Sheets – Gardening Australia – ABC

  • Author: www.abc.net.au

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (36686 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Coffee Compost – Fact Sheets – Gardening Australia – ABC Coffee grounds are high in potassium and nitrogen. The high carbon content helps feed the soil. Coffee grounds on their own are too acidic to be …

  • Match the search results: Coffee grounds on their own are too acidic to use straight on the garden so Stuart mixes them with organic waste. He has several ‘trial’ mixes on the go, but his most successful version uses sawdust.

  • Quote from the source:

10 Ways to use Coffee in your Garden

  • Author: www.palmers.co.nz

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (19546 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about 10 Ways to use Coffee in your Garden 1. Compost. Adding coffee grounds to your compost can actually help the food decompose faster than normal. · 2. Soil enhancer. Sprinkle a thin layer of coffee …

  • Match the search results: Some gardeners believe that the smell of coffee grounds and its make up help to keep insects and pests away. Sprinkle coffee grounds around your plants and garden to keep those pests that like munching on your fruit and veges out! The theory is that the caffeine in the coffee grounds negatively affe…

  • Quote from the source:

How to Use Coffee Grounds in the Garden – 2022 – MasterClass

  • Author: www.masterclass.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (16142 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Use Coffee Grounds in the Garden – 2022 – MasterClass Coffee grounds are a waste product from brewing coffee that is commonly used in home gardens to add nutrients to the soil or decrease soil …

  • Match the search results:
    Cloudflare Ray ID: 6f49fecd7d2a18ac

    Your IP: 103.116.106.104

    Performance & security by Cloudflare

  • Quote from the source:

Coffee grounds, eggshells and Epsom salts in the home garden

  • Author: extension.umn.edu

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (10273 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Coffee grounds, eggshells and Epsom salts in the home garden Quick facts. Coffee grounds contain compounds that feed healthy soil but they don’t lower pH. Eggshells do not prevent blossom end rot. They add organic …

  • Match the search results: Chalker-Scott, L., 2009. Miracle, myth… or marketing: Coffee grounds – will they perk up plants? https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/coffee-grounds.pdf

  • Quote from the source:

Grounds in the Garden – Urban Programs Travis County

  • Author: travis-tx.tamu.edu

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (38084 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Grounds in the Garden – Urban Programs Travis County Adding coffee grounds to your garden and compost is a quick, easy way to add nutrients and organic matter to your soil. Coffee grounds ready for composting.

  • Match the search results: You can add grounds directly to the soil by digging them into six inches of soil. You can also sprinkle them on top of soil as long as you are careful not to form a thick crust.  Or, put grounds into your compost bin – they’ll heat everything up in no time!

  • Quote from the source:

Coffee Grounds for Plants: Recyclable Miracle or Harmful …

  • Author: rurallivingtoday.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (12651 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Coffee Grounds for Plants: Recyclable Miracle or Harmful … Coffee grounds are said to be good fertilizer because they are rich in nitrogen, which they release into the soil. Nitrogen is one of the key nutrients plants …

  • Match the search results: Perhaps the best use of coffee grounds is in compost. Adding coffee grounds to your compost pile or compost tumbler and then adding the compost to your garden is one of the best ways to use coffee grounds in the garden.

  • Quote from the source:

Wake up and use the coffee – grounds, that is! – ANR Blogs

  • Author: ucanr.edu

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (14394 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Wake up and use the coffee – grounds, that is! – ANR Blogs Adding acid to my soil should be a hit. Got to get back to doing the coffee ground thing. Thanks for the info. Login to leave a comment.

  • Match the search results: Spread a 1-inch layer of moist coffee grounds on the soil in your vegetable garden.  Add a nitrogen fertilizer to the soil according to the package directions. The nitrogen fertilizer speeds the decomposition of the coffee grounds and gives your vegetable plants more nutrients Mix the coffee gr…

  • Quote from the source:

Can coffee grounds be used in my garden and lawn? – Burger …

  • Author: burgerfarms.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (29191 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Can coffee grounds be used in my garden and lawn? – Burger … The nutrients in coffee grounds are slowly broken down, … Composting coffee grounds helps to add nitrogen to your compost pile.

  • Match the search results: Many people feel that coffee grounds lower the pH (or raise the acid level) of soil, which is good for acid loving plants.  But this is only true for unwashed coffee grounds. “Fresh coffee grounds are acidic. Used coffee grounds are neutral.” If you rinse your used coffee grounds, the…

  • Quote from the source:

Coffee grounds for plants: are they good for your garden?

  • Author: www.bhg.com.au

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (12733 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Coffee grounds for plants: are they good for your garden? Why you should put coffee grounds on your plants · Why get coffee grounds for your plants? · What plants and soil work well with coffee grounds?

  • Match the search results: A bit of research and some trial and error are the best ways to make sure you get the most out of your coffee grounds. A good rule of thumb to follow is to only use coffee grounds if your plants have been growing for a while, so that the additional nitrogen doesn’t overwhelm the bacteria.

  • Quote from the source:

How to Use Coffee Grounds in Your Garden – wikiHow

  • Author: www.wikihow.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (18131 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Use Coffee Grounds in Your Garden – wikiHow Use coffee grounds to add nutrients to your soil. [9] X Expert Source · Ben Barkan … To do this, place a handful of coffee grounds into a bucket of water.

  • Match the search results: If you’re looking for ways to use coffee grounds in your garden, try mixing them in with your compost. Coffee grounds are considered a green material, and they provide extra organic matter in addition to speeding up the decomposition process. If you have plants that prefer acidic soil, like blueberr…

  • Quote from the source:

Multi-read content what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil

Whether you’re brewing your daily cup of coffee or have noticed your local coffee shop starting to drop bags of used coffee, you’re probably wondering about brewing with coffee grounds. Is coffee grounds as fertilizer a good idea? How do garden used coffee grounds help or hurt? Keep reading to learn more about coffee grounds and gardening.

Preparation of coffee

Brewing coffee is a great way to use up something that would otherwise take up space in a landfill. Composting coffee grounds helps add nitrogen to your compost pile.

Composting coffee grounds is as easy as throwing used coffee grounds on your compost pile. Used coffee filters can also be brewed.

If you are going to add used coffee grounds to your compost pile, remember that they are consideredgreen compost materialand will need to be balanced with the addition of somebrown compost material.

Coffee pods as fertilizer

Coffee grounds used for gardening do not end up in compost. Many people choose to put the coffee grounds directly on the ground and use them as fertilizer. The thing to note is that even though the coffee grounds addNitrogenin your compost, they will not immediately add nitrogen to your soil.

The benefit of using coffee grounds as a fertilizer is that it adds organic matter to the soil, which improves drainage, water retention, and soil aeration. The used coffee grounds will also help microorganisms beneficial to plant growth to thrive as well asattract earthworms.

Many people think that coffee groundslower the pH (or increase the acidity) of the soil, it’s good foracidophilic plant. However, this is only true for unwashed coffee grounds. Fresh coffee grounds are acidic. The coffee grounds used are neutral. If you rinse used coffee grounds, they will have a near-neutral pH of 6.5 and will not affect the acidity of the soil.

To use coffee grounds as fertilizer, apply coffee grounds to the soil around your plants.Leftover diluted coffeeworks well that way too.

Other uses for used coffee grounds in the garden

Coffee grounds can also be used in your garden for other things.

  • Many gardeners like to use used coffee grounds as
  • coating
  • for their crops.
  • Other uses of coffee grounds include its use to contain
  • corny
  • and
  • Snail
  • away from plants. The theory is that the caffeine in the coffee grounds negatively affects these pests and thus avoids the soil where the coffee grounds are.
  • Some people also think that coffee grounds on the ground are a
  • repellent cat
  • and prevent cats from using your flower and vegetable beds as litter boxes.
  • You can use coffee grounds as
  • food for worms
  • the same if you do
  • vermicompost
  • with a bucket of worms. Worms love coffee grounds.

Use fresh coffee

We get a lot of questions about using fresh coffee grounds in the garden. Although not always recommended, it is not a problem in some cases.

  • For example, you can sprinkle fresh coffee grounds around acid-loving plants like azaleas, hydrangeas, blueberries, and lilies. Many vegetables prefer slightly acidic soil, but
  • tomato
  • generally does not respond well to the addition of coffee grounds. Root crops, such as
  • radish
  • and
  • carrot
  • otherwise, the reaction is favorable – especially when mixed with the soil at planting time.
  • Using fresh coffee grounds is also said to deter weeds.
  • allelopathic attributes
  • , which negatively affects tomato seedlings. Another reason why it should be used with care. That said, some fungal diseases can also be prevented.
  • Scattering fresh coffee grounds around plants (and on the ground) helps deter some of the same pests as used coffee grounds. Although it won’t eliminate them completely, it does seem to help keep cats, rabbits and slugs away, minimizing their damage in the garden. As mentioned earlier, this is meant to be
  • due to caffeine content
  • .
  • Instead of the caffeine present in fresh, uncooked coffee grounds, which can harm plants, you can use decaffeinated coffee or just fresh grounds to avoid any problems.

RELATED: 5 Easy DIY Plant Food Recipes Using Kitchen Scraps

Coffee grounds and horticulture naturally go hand in hand. Whether you brew with coffee grounds or use used coffee grounds in the yard, you’ll find that coffee can give your garden as much choice for me as it does for you.

Popular questions about what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil

what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil?

Using Coffee Grounds as Fertilizer But it turns out that coffee grounds contain a good amount of the essential nutrient nitrogen as well as some potassium and phosphorus, plus other micronutrients. The quantity and proportions of these nutrients varies, but coffee grounds can be used as a slow-release fertilizer.

What plants benefit from adding coffee grounds?

The plants that like coffee grounds include roses, blueberries, azaleas, carrots, radishes, rhododendrons, hydrangeas, cabbage, lilies, and hollies. These are all acid-loving plants that grow best in acidic soil. You’ll want to avoid using coffee grounds on plants like tomatoes, clovers, and alfalfa.

What nutrients do coffee grounds give plants?

Coffee grounds as fertilizer

Coffee grounds contain several essential nutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus, along with micronutrients — all of which make using coffee grounds for plant mulch a great idea.

Can you just add coffee grounds to soil?

Lewis Spencer adds: ‘To use coffee compost, simply sprinkle the grounds directly onto your soil and lightly rake it in. Coffee grounds add organic material to the soil, helping water retention, aeration and drainage. ‘Leftover diluted coffee can create a liquid plant fertilizer, too.

Why do you mix coffee grounds with potting soil?

Instead of buying plant food for fertilizing your houseplants, try amending ordinary potting soil with Epsom salt and coffee grounds. Epsom salt supplies magnesium and lowers the pH of potting soil, making it easier for plants to absorb other nutrients. Coffee grounds help plants absorb nitrogen.

Can coffee grounds be used as fertilizer?

To use coffee grounds as fertilizer, simply sprinkle them onto the soil surrounding your plants. Summary Coffee grounds make great fertilizer because they contain several key nutrients required for plant growth. They can also help attract worms and decrease the concentrations of heavy metals in the soil.

Where do you put coffee grounds in your garden?

To use coffee grounds as a fertilizer sprinkle them thinly onto your soil, or add them to your compost heap. Despite their color, for the purposes of composting they’re a ‘green’, or nitrogen-rich organic material.

Do coffee grounds acidify soil?

Coffee grounds are highly acidic, they will lower the pH of your soil, making it more acidic. As a consequence, they can be beneficial to acid-loving plants. Coffee grounds can contribute nitrogen to soil.

Can you put coffee grounds in potted plants?

Yes! Coffee grounds can be especially beneficial to houseplants when used as a mulch, pesticide, compost, or fertilizer. You can even water your plants using coffee.

Are coffee grounds good for vegetable gardens?

All in all, coffee grounds are good for vegetables and other plants, as they encourage the growth of microorganisms in the soil and improve tilth.

How do you fertilize indoor plants with coffee grounds?

“The best way to use coffee grounds for plants is adding it to your compost pile, and then mixing a little bit of that compost in with your potting soil,” Marino says. Diluting coffee grounds works the same way as diluting fertilizer: using just a teaspoon of coffee grounds per gallon of water.

Are coffee grounds good for plants and trees?

Fungus prevention

Coffee grounds have been known to keep your plants strong and healthy, even enough to ward off fungal infection. Sprinkle the coffee grounds around the stem and base of your plants.

Are eggshells good for the garden?

The calcium from eggshells is also welcome in garden soil, where it moderates soil acidity while providing nutrients for plants. Eggshells contain such an abundance of calcium that they can be used almost like lime, though you would need a lot of eggshells to make a measurable impact.

Are coffee grounds good for tomatoes?

Coffee grounds contain around 2% nitrogen, and variable amounts of phosphorus and potassium, which are the core nutrients vital for tomato plant growth. As the grounds decompose, they will release these nutrients into the soil, making them available to the plant.

Which plants do not like used coffee grounds?

Coffee grounds are highly acidic, they note, so they should be reserved for acid-loving plants like azaleas and blueberries. And if your soil is already high in nitrogen, the extra boost from coffee grounds could stunt the growth of fruits and flowers.

Video tutorials about what nutrients do coffee grounds add to soil

keywords: #coffeegrounds, #usedcoffeegrounds, #coffeegroundsforgarden, #coffeegroundscompost, #activelyaerated, #composttea, #comfrey, #comfreytea, #soilfertility, #freefertilizer, #compost, #mulch, #soilfoodweb, #teamingwithmicrobes, #beneficialmicrobes, #makeadifference, #buildtopsoil, #vermicompost, #wormcastings, #organicgardening, #permaculture, #redwigglers, #earthworms, #no-tillgardening, #mycorrhizae, #sheetmulchgarden, #fourseasonsgardening, #Garden, #freecompost, #woodchips

Used coffee grounds are a great free resource to put to work in your garden. They enrich the soil with nitrogen and other minerals, improve soil structure, and increase organic matter in the soil. We use them in compost, vermicompost, and as a mulch. Why not give them a try in your garden?

OYR is all about growing a lot of food on a little land using sustainable organic methods, while keeping costs and labor at a minimum. Emphasis is placed on improving soil quality with compost, mulch, and compost tea. No store-bought fertilizers, soil amendments, pesticides, compost activators, etc. are used.

Featured Videos:

How Much Coffee do We Use in the Garden:

-http://youtu.be/C6eFfg92-70

Soil Fertility Playlist:

-http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0v8SWe2uDw\u0026list=PLApXYvbprElwCOe5gdtcOMiEMGRpUBb4e

Winter Vegetable Garden:

-http://youtu.be/Scru8xQ-Akk

Planting Our First Fall/Winter Cover Crop:

-http://youtu.be/OlEQktwaJiE

How We Grow Vegetables Without Fertilizer:

-http://youtu.be/nvJAHQXmO6U

keywords: #Low, #Cost, #Gardening, #Garden(Industry), #usedcoffeegrounds, #spentcoffeegrounds, #starbucks, #coffee, #esspresso, #compost, #leaves, #leaf, #Cafe, #Fertilizer(Material)

Today we are going to talk about using spent coffee grounds in your garden and what benefits are.

Lab Report:

-http://www.albertaurbangarden.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/150208_AlbertaUrbanGardenCertificateofAnalysis-RevistedReport.pdf

Programs like Starbucks grounds for your garden provide spent coffee grounds for use in your garden at no cost. These grounds can provide a number of benefits to your garden that help build your soil and feed your plants. Spent coffee grounds are high in nitrogen and also have phosphorus, potassium and a number of other trace elements considered to be beneficial or essential for plant growth.

My local Starbucks was kind enough to provide samples of used and unused coffee grounds for analysis to take down to Maxxam Analytics.  These samples will tell us the pH, the immediately available N-P-K and the total available and unavailable trace elements.

A common concern about using coffee grounds in the garden is that they will change the pH of the soil. Fast changes in pH can negatively impact the nutrient cycle in your soil impeding plants ability to absorb nutrients.

The pH of the unused coffee grounds was reported at 5.88 and the used grounds at 5.4. These numbers fall on the lower end of the optimal range for plant growth according to Dr. Perry with the University of Vermont. [1]

If used in the creation of compost over time the acid will become neutralized as the material breaks down. [5] When used as mulch generally you are applying small enough quantities that any transfer of acidity to the soil will be neutralized by the soils natural buffering capacity. [7]

Now that we know using coffee grounds in the garden don’t change the pH let’s talk about the use of used coffee grounds to add nutrients to the soil.

In order to compare used coffee grounds to commercial products and other samples I have run we will present the results in N-P-K and leave the trace elements in mg/kg.

The lab results represent what is immediately available to the plants. The lab uses a weak acid wash to replicate soil conditions and isolate the available organic nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

The N-P-K of used coffee grounds is: 0.00083 — 0.2016 — 0.771

And the N-P-K of unused coffee grounds is: 0.00036 — 0.3208 — 2.41

References:

Optimal pH for plant growth:

-http://pss.uvm.edu/ppp/pubs/oh34.htm

Nitrogen Cycle:

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_cycle

Atomic mass:

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_atomic_mass

The Chemical Composition of exhausted coffee waste:

-http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:0ChFgQV_POYJ:www.researchgate.net/publication/257418689_The_chemical_composition_of_exhausted_coffee_waste/links/00b495253eabc2623c000000.pdf+\u0026cd=1\u0026hl=en\u0026ct=clnk\u0026gl=ca

The evaluation of coffee grounds in compost:

-http://www.researchgate.net/publication/255578345_Maturity_Indices_as_an_Index_to_Evaluate_the_Quality_of_Compost_of_Coffee_Waste_Blended_with_Other_Organic_Wastes

Unverified Analysis of Grounds for your Garden Results

-http://www.sunset.com/garden/earth-friendly/starbucks-coffee-compost-test

Do Coffee Grounds Acidify your Soil?

-http://www.gardenmyths.com/coffee-grounds-acidifies-soil/

Conversion Calculation

-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labeling_of_fertilizer#Converting_nutrient_analysis_to_composition

thumbnail Credit:

-http://www.brucesbrew.com/coffee-storage.html#axzz3R4wI6QbT

keywords:

keywords: #CoffeeGrounds, #Garden, #Grinds, #Compost, #Soil, #Mulch, #Benefits, #Free, #Resource, #Plant, #Fertilizer, #Nitrogen, #Phosphorus, #Potassium, #Copper, #Magnesium, #Abundance, #Vegtables, #FruitTrees

In this video Dan from

-http://www.PlantAbundance.com

Japanese Hori Hori Digging Tool:

-http://amzn.to/1RPnorJ

Feels Good 2 B by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (

-https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Artist:

-http://audionautix.com/

See more articles in category: FAQS