Top 22 how to grow norfolk island pine

Below is the best information and knowledge about how to grow norfolk island pine compiled and compiled by the hkfindall.com team, along with other related topics such as:: norfolk island pine growing zone, how to grow norfolk island pine from seed, norfolk island pine multiple trunks, norfolk island pine full grown, norfolk island pine soil mix, norfolk island pine light requirements, norfolk island pine seed pods, norfolk island pine seeds.

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Can A Norfolk Island Pine Grow Outdoors – Gardening Know …

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  • Summary: Articles about Can A Norfolk Island Pine Grow Outdoors – Gardening Know … If you want Norfolk Pines in the landscape near your home, plant them in an open, bright location. Don’t site them in full sun though. Norfolk …

  • Match the search results: You’re far more likely to see Norfolk Island pine in the living room than a Norfolk Island pine in the garden. Young trees are often sold as miniature indoor Christmas trees or used as indoor houseplants. Can a Norfolk Island pine grow outdoors? It can in the correct climate. Read on to learn about …

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How to Take Care of Norfolk Island Pines – Pennington Seed

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  • Summary: Articles about How to Take Care of Norfolk Island Pines – Pennington Seed Along parts of the California Coast, Norfolk Island pines grow 100 feet or taller, stretching up to 60 feet wide and growing up to 2 feet per year.1 On …

  • Match the search results: Once your Norfolk Island pine gets settled into your home, it’s a low-maintenance, high-enjoyment standard for years to come. Products from Pennington Fertilizer’s Lilly Miller and Alaska lines of plant care products can help you keep your Norfolk Island pine healthy, happy and ready for holiday che…

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Norfolk Island Pine Production Guide

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  • Summary: Articles about Norfolk Island Pine Production Guide Seed should be placed flat on the germination medium without covering and lightly misted or fogged until the tap root emerges and top growth is initiated. At …

  • Match the search results: Araucaria heterophylla (Norfolk Island Pine or
    Australian Pine) is a southern hemisphere conifer native to the
    Norfolk Islands and Australia. This tree has been referred to
    incorrectly as Araucaria excelsa for a number of years.
    Norfolk Island Pine is one of the few conifers able to adapt to

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How to Grow a Norfolk Island Pine as a Houseplant – Dengarden

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  • Summary: Articles about How to Grow a Norfolk Island Pine as a Houseplant – Dengarden In their natural environment, Norfolk Island pines are very tall growing to a height of 200 feet. They are also very long-lived, often reaching …

  • Match the search results: As their name implies, Norfolk Island pines (Araucaria heterophylla) are indigenous to the Norfolk Islands in the South Pacific as well as Australia, New Zealand and New Caledonia. They are not true pine trees. Norfolk Island pines are members of an ancient plant family called Araucaria whose member…

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How to Care for a Norfolk Island Pine – The Sill

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  • Summary: Articles about How to Care for a Norfolk Island Pine – The Sill Water every 1-2 weeks, allowing soil to dry out between waterings. A tropical plant, the Norfolk Island Pine’s potting mix can be kept semi-moist, but not wet, …

  • Match the search results: The Norfolk Island Pine hails from Norfolk Island, a small island in the Pacific Ocean between New Zealand and New Caledonia. Norfolk Island is a significant place for botanists because it is one of the only islands left in the world with several surviving fossil species. Over 50 of the Island’s nat…

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Propagating a Norfolk Island pine is tricky. Here’s how to try it.

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  • Summary: Articles about Propagating a Norfolk Island pine is tricky. Here’s how to try it. Norfolk Island pine is a large, tropical evergreen tree grown for its unusual, scaled foliage and symmetrical growth habit.

  • Match the search results: I have a Norfolk Island pine that is starting to get too big for its space in my house. All the lower branches have fallen off too. It was a present from a good friend, so I want to keep it going. Can I cut it back to reduce its size or propagate it?

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How to Grow a Norfolk Pine From Clippings – Home Guides

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  • Summary: Articles about How to Grow a Norfolk Pine From Clippings – Home Guides Grow the Norfolk Island pine under light shade for its first summer. Provide 1 inch of water weekly and mist the foliage daily to keep it hydrated. Transplant …

  • Match the search results: Sometimes called star pines, Norfolk Island pines (Araucaria heterophylla) are tropical evergreen trees grown for their unusual, scaled foliage and symmetrical growth habit. They grow best within U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 to 11, where they will reach a mature height of …

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How can I plant or transplant a Norfolk Island Pine? What time …

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  • Summary: Articles about How can I plant or transplant a Norfolk Island Pine? What time … Norfolk Island pine can be grown in containers. It needs bright light but keep it out of full sun except for a short period each day. Cool (60- …

  • Match the search results: To answer the second part of your question first – the Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla) is a tropical plant so it can only grow outdoors in the United States in the warmest part of the country (Zones 10 – 11). It you have it growing in a container then you can move it outside in any…

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How to Care for Norfolk Pines | Bloomscape

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  • Summary: Articles about How to Care for Norfolk Pines | Bloomscape Though it’s called Norfolk Pine, it’s not a pine at all. Rather, this tree is a tropical plant native to the South Pacific. These …

  • Match the search results: Your Norfolk Pine will appreciate a boost in humidity during the winter months. You can increase humidity for your Norfolk Pine by using a pebble tray, placing a humidifier nearby, or grouping it near other plants.

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Norfolk Island Pine Tree Guide: 8 Tips for Care and Growth

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  • Summary: Articles about Norfolk Island Pine Tree Guide: 8 Tips for Care and Growth Prepare a pot or plot. Norfolk Island pines can grow indoors as a potted plant or outdoors in your garden. If you’d like to keep these as indoor …

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Houseplant of the Month: Norfolk Island Pine – Sylvan Nursery

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  • Summary: Articles about Houseplant of the Month: Norfolk Island Pine – Sylvan Nursery Rather, this stately tree is a tropical plant native to the South Pacific. Indoors, it’s relatively slow-growing, but over the course of several …

  • Match the search results: Grow Norfolk Island pine in a medium to bright spot in your home. The less light it gets, the slower it will grow. But avoid very low-light situations. If it doesn’t get enough light (natural or artificial), your Norfolk Island pine will be weak, spindly, and unattractive.

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1321 – Norfolk Island Pine – PlantTalk Colorado

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  • Summary: Articles about 1321 – Norfolk Island Pine – PlantTalk Colorado Norfolk Island pines need at least two hours of bright, indirect sunlight daily to maintain their bright green foliage color. To ensure symmetrical, upright …

  • Match the search results: The Norfolk Island pine is not a true pine and is not hardy in Colorado climates. The small trees are uniform in appearance and have branches that are parallel to the ground. They are often marketed as an alternative to a typical Christmas tree.

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Norfolk Pine: Care & Growing Guide – MyDomaine

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  • Summary: Articles about Norfolk Pine: Care & Growing Guide – MyDomaine Botanical Name: Araucaria heterophylla; Common Name: Norfolk pine, Norfolk Island pine; Plant Type: Needled evergreen conifer …

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    For its soil needs, your Norfolk pine likes slightly acidic soil. A peat-based potting mixture will be the best choice for your indoor Norfolk pine. If you permanently plant your Norfolk pine outside, it will do best in sandy, rich, peat-mixed soil. However, note that this tree is not cold hardy, s…

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Norfolk Island Pine Needs TLC – Indiana Yard and Garden

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  • Summary: Articles about Norfolk Island Pine Needs TLC – Indiana Yard and Garden Unlike most pines that are familiar to Midwesterners, the Norfolk Island pine is far too tender to plant outdoors in our climate and, …

  • Match the search results: Unlike most pines that are familiar to Midwesterners, the Norfolk Island pine is far too tender to plant outdoors in our climate and, in fact, is not a true pine at all. But the good news is that it makes an elegant houseplant when given proper care. It also makes a terrific living Christmas tree; i…

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Norfolk Island pine: a living Christmas tree – University of …

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  • Summary: Articles about Norfolk Island pine: a living Christmas tree – University of … You want the soil to be moist, but never wet. Use a sand, peat moss or other mix that offers good drainage. When you first bring your Norfolk Island pine home, …

  • Match the search results: Interestingly enough, Norfolk Island pines are not actually pines at all. They are from an ancient plant family of conifers named Araucariaceae dating back to the prehistoric age and currently found only in the Southern Hemisphere. Norfolk Island pines are named after Norfolk Island, where they were…

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Growing and Caring for Norfolk Island Pine – Treehugger

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  • Summary: Articles about Growing and Caring for Norfolk Island Pine – Treehugger Norfolk Island Pine is one of the few conifers able to adapt to inside the home and is able to tolerate relatively low light levels. In its native habitat, this …

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    Araucaria heterophylla, or Norfolk Island pine or Australian pine, is a southern hemisphere conifer native to the Norfolk Islands and Australia. Technically, it's not a real pine. Norfolk Island Pine is one of the few conifers able to adapt to inside the home and is able to tolerate relatively …

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Norfolk Island Pine | Costa Farms

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  • Summary: Articles about Norfolk Island Pine | Costa Farms Though it’s called Norfolk Island pine, it’s not a pine at all. Rather, this stately tree is a tropical plant native to the South Pacific. Indoors, it’s …

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    An easy-care houseplant, Norfolk Island pine is a festive holiday plant you can enjoy all year long! During the holidays, its needled branches look right at home decorated as a Christmas tree. After the holidays pass, remove the decorations and enjoy its classic look (and air-purif…

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Q&A: Norfolk Island Pines | HGTV

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  • Summary: Articles about Q&A: Norfolk Island Pines | HGTV Norfolk Island pines are often grown as houseplants, but in your gardening region they can also be planted outdoors. Indoors, provide bright light and …

  • Match the search results: Q: I just bought a Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla), and it doesn’t have instructions on how to care for it. I can’t find it on a web site. Please tell me how to best care for this Christmas tree. — Clovis, Calif.

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Norfolk Island Pines – Illinois Extension

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  • Summary: Articles about Norfolk Island Pines – Illinois Extension As houseplants Norfolk Island pines are slow-growing, often growing three to six inches per year, so don’t be alarmed if your tree isn’t growing …

  • Match the search results: Despite their name, these evergreens are not actually pine trees. Instead, they belong to an ancient plant family named Araucariaceae (pines are in the Pinaceae). This family of plants was widespread during the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods, but are now confined to the Southern Hemisphere. Norfolk…

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Dealing With Your Ginormous Norfolk Island Pine – Southern …

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  • Summary: Articles about Dealing With Your Ginormous Norfolk Island Pine – Southern … Growing Tips. Norfolk Island pine needs bright light. Place it near the sunniest windows in your house. If the light isn’t bright enough, the …

  • Match the search results: Not a true pine, Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla) is a beautiful evergreen tree named for its native home of Norfolk Island off the coast of Australia. It's hardy outdoors in places like south Florida where it doesn't freeze in winter, but most of us grow it as a houseplant. We…

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Norfolk Island Pine | Better Homes & Gardens

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  • Summary: Articles about Norfolk Island Pine | Better Homes & Gardens Grow Norfolk Island pine in medium to bright light near a west- or south-facing window. The less light Norfolk Island pine receives, the slower it will grow …

  • Match the search results: Grow Norfolk Island pine in medium to bright light near a west- or south-facing window. The less light Norfolk Island pine receives, the slower it will grow; however, even if you want to curb growth, avoid low-light situations. If it doesn't get enough light it will be weak, spindly, and unattr…

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How To Grow Norfolk Island Pine, A Living Christmas Tree

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  • Summary: Articles about How To Grow Norfolk Island Pine, A Living Christmas Tree The Norfolk Island pine just loves full, direct sunlight. While it enjoys high light, the plant can actually still survive in low-light …

  • Match the search results: The Norfolk Island pine just loves full, direct sunlight. While it enjoys high light, the plant can actually still survive in low-light conditions for lengthy periods of time. In fact, they’re known to survive months with minimal light, so Norfolk Island pines are perfect indoors for the winte…

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Multi-read content how to grow norfolk island pine

Araucaria heterophylla

Can you bring an evergreen tree into your house for the holidays, one that you won’t have to put on the sidewalk after the festival is over?

The Norfolk Island pine is a living Christmas tree that you can keep as an indoor bonsai tree and enjoy through the seasons, year after year.

My husband and I have one of these plants in our houseplant collection. But this tree narrowly escaped death by becoming food compost!

A close up vertical image of potted Norfolk Island pine trees growing in small pots indoors. To the top and bottom of the frame is green and white printed text.

We connect with suppliers to help you find the right products. If you buy from one of our links,we can earn a commission.

I’ll tell you about my tree’s second chance later in the article – just keep in mind that these evergreens are tougher than you might think.

I’ll walk you through the best care practices for these tropical evergreens so you can keep them green, healthy, and at a manageable size for more than one holiday season.

And by following these tips, your tree will never have a question mark next to its name on the “To Compost” list.

Here’s what I’m going to show you:

What you will learn

  • What is the Norfolk Island pine?
  • Agriculture and history
  • spread
  • how to grow
  • Development tips
  • Size and care
  • Or buy
  • pest control
  • best use
  • Quick Reference Development Guide

What is the Norfolk Island pine?

Araucaria heterophyllaNorfolk Island pine, as it is more commonly known, is a conifer valued for its attractive evergreen foliage and symmetrical shape.

This tree is also called “domestic pine”, “star pine”, “triangle”, “Australian pine” or “Polynesian pine”. Previously it wasclassified by taxonequalA. excelsa.

Another common name you may be most familiar with is “living Christmas tree”. It is also commonly referred to simply as “Norfolk pine”.

This conifer is symmetrical in shape with widely spaced layers of curved branches extending horizontally from a straight trunk.

The species name “heterophylla” means “different leaves” and hints at one of the plant’s quirks.

Its young leaves are needle-like, while its more mature leaves are more scale-like. Both types of leaves can be found on the tree at the same time.

A close up of the mature leaves of Araucaria heterophylla pictured on a soft focus background.Mature leaves on A. heterophylla.

Mature leaves are small, a quarter inch long and scaly. They can be conical or triangular.

On the other hand, young leaves are half an inch long and can be mistaken for evergreen or spruce.

A close up horizontal image of a hand from the left of the frame holding the leaves of a juvenile Araucaria heterophylla plant pictured on a soft focus background.Young leaves on A. heterophylla. Photo by Kristina Hicks-Hamblin.

Unlike some conifers, which have sharp, pointed needles, this tree’s foliage has a wonderfully smooth and soft texture – except it’s along the trunk.

The needles growing along the gray-brown trunk of this tree are nothing to fear, so keep an eye on your fingers as you move this pine’s position!

A close up vertical image of the stems of a Araucaria heterophylla tree with short, green spines, pictured on a soft focus background.

Each year, a new layer of branches emerges from the top of the tree.

The branches radiate symmetrically, giving this evergreen conifer its pyramidal appearance.

A close up top down horizontal image of a Araucaria heterophylla tree growing in a container outside a residence.

If yours doesn’t have that particular pyramid, there’s a reason for it. Plants sold in garden centers often contain more than one sapling per pot, giving them a bushier and less symmetrical appearance.

When these trees grow outdoors, about ten to fifteen years old, they begin to produce large cones containing edible seeds similar to pine nuts.

However, despite their pine-like appearance and seeds, these conifers are not actually pines.

Agriculture and history

Norfolk Island pines are part of the Araucariaceae family, an ancient family of conifers common throughout the world as dinosaurs roamed the Earth.

But the same events that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs toodestroys most species of this family.

However, 41 known species of this family remain, mostly in the southern hemisphere.

They are considered “living fossils” or living fossils because most of their relatives are extinct. Among these living fossils is the subject of our article.

One of the other living fossils is a tree you may be familiar with – the monkey tree,A.araucana, is also an evergreen conifer.

A close up horizontal image of a large monkey puzzle tree growing outdoors with a snowy landscape in soft focus in the background.Araucaria araucana or monkey tree.

Native to the lower slopes of the Andes, the most cold-tolerant monkey tree is the subject of this article.

Although closely related to this South American gymnosperm,A. heterophylladoes not naturally grow near the monkey tree. Like most of his living relatives,A. heterophyllaNative to the South Pacific.

In the case of this tree, it is native to the small island that gives it its name – Norfolk Island, an Australian territory located between Australia, New Zealand and New Caledonia.

Norfolk Island became known to Europeans after Captain Cook visited the area on his second South Pacific voyage in 1774.

He thought that perfectly straight trunks would be suitable for use as masts for ships, but it turns out that is not the case – despite their coastal origin, these trees do not resist wind as strong as one would think. .

Today, this evergreen conifer is grown as an ornamental in subtropical regions, where it can grow up to 200 feet tall.

In the United States it can be grown in the landscapeUSDA’s tough industry10-11, includes Hawaii and parts of California and Florida. thehighest in the United Statesestimated 115 feet tall and about 115 years old in 2019.

In addition to being used as a landscaping feature, the wood from these trees is prized for woodworking and is used in Hawaii and other places where it grows to create crafts. .

A vertical image of a small Araucaria heterophylla tree in a dark gray pot set on a side table next to a leather chair and a window, with gold Christmas decorations beside it.Photo by Kristine Lofgren.

For those of us who don’t live in such a tropical climate, the Norfolk Island pine is grown indoors as a houseplant, where it usually reaches a maximum height of 5 to 8 feet.

spread

If you want to try propagating this plant, you have several options: grow a clone from cuttings, create an air layer, or grow a new plant from seed.

I’ll focus on the two most accessible methods and leave that discussion aside for now – but maybe that will come up in a future article.

Let’s start by growing new plants from seed.

From seed

If you’ve ever purchased one of these evergreen conifers, chances are it was grown from seed – which is the primary method used for commercial propagation of these plants. This makes them somewhat unique among houseplants.

Many indoor plants – such as prayer plants,african violets,snake tree, andOrchid- usually propagated vegetatively, by division or cuttings, producing new plantsReplicationof the parent tree.

However, with living Christmas trees, each tree grown from seed is a true individual with its own unique genetic makeup.

A close up horizontal image of small Norfolk Island pine tree seedlings growing in rich soil.

Now that I’ve finished my poem about the scientific wonders of seed propagation, shall we continue with how?

First you will need to find Norfolk Island Pine Nuts.

Or, if you plan to grow these trees and give them as gifts, you might want to get a whole pine from one of these gorgeous trees. A pine cone contains dozens of seed capsules, each containing a single seed.

Use recently harvested seeds, as they quickly lose viability – after only three months of storage,about halfthe seed will lose its ability to germinate.

 A close up horizontal image of a pine cone that is not yet dried out.

You will also need small potting pots, sterile potting soil or soilless potting soil, and a mist plant. If you are reusing old nursery pots, be sure to sterilize them first.

Fill the pot with soil, leaving an inch of space below the rim at the top.

If you are working with cones, remove the seed capsules if they are still sticky.

Place the bag of seeds above ground in each of your nursery pots, but do not cover it with soil.

This surface seeding technique isrecommended by R.T. Poole et alat the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and the Central Florida Center for Education and Research in Apopka.

And you might want to take the advice of commercial growers of these plants – they often plant several saplings in one pot to give the plants a fuller, bushier appearance.

After sowing the seeds on the surface, water the soil with a mister to keep the top of the soil moist but not soggy.

If you live in a dry climate like me, you might want to cover the pot with a wet tent – a clear plastic container held in place with a rubber band to retain moisture. Where you can put your seedlingsin a terrariumor greenhouse.

Place the pots where the seeds will be exposed to plenty of light – they need light to germinate – and keep them at 70-80°F. You may need a heating pad to help maintain this temperature .

The Jump Start Heat Mat is sized to fit on a windowsill and isavailable from Arbico Organics.

A close up of a Jump Start Windowsill Heat Mat pictured on a white background.

Jump Start Window Sill Heated Mat

Your seeds should germinate in 10 to 21 days.

Once the seeds have sprouted, you can remove them from the damp tent. Keep your seedlings at a temperature of 60-90°F while they begin to form.

As your sapling begins to grow, begin watering normally, whenever the top of the soil dries out. Your young plants should be ready to be repotted about ten weeks after germination.

It will take at least two years of growth before your sapling will sprout. If necessary, prepare to repot your living Christmas tree.

cuttings

Another method of propagating this species is by cutting the roots of the mother plant. However, the process is not as simple as seed propagation.

This is the problem:

If you take yourscut from a tree branch, this cup will not grow like a tree – it will grow like a twig.

So if you want a new plant to grow upright like a tree, you will need to cut off the top. The difficulty here is onlyathe head grows on every tree.

If you cut off the top of the growth, it can kill the plant or, at best, cause it to lose its symmetrical shape.

However, there is one special case where you might want to do this: if you have a living Christmas tree that’s already bigger than your house, but you want to preserve it for sentimental reasons.

You basically hold apartof the old tree is alive, if not the whole thing.

Some gardeners report that cutting off the parent plant and letting it regrow has worked for them.

But before you grab your pruners and start chopping down your tree, let me warn you that rooting cuttings aren’t always successful. Cuttings should be kept in warm, moist soil.

If you decide to try this, use a heat pad as I mentioned above.

On the other hand, if you’re the experimental type like me and want to try cutting roots from a tree branch just for fun, go for it. This can be a good practice to try first if you really want to try rooting from the top later.

In fact, can we all agree that no one tries to cut the top of a growing tree until they have practiced with a twig first? Alright, fine. Now, let’s start our practice.

A top down horizontal image of pruners, a cutting from a Norfolk Island pine tree, and two black pots filled with soil, set on a wooden surface.Photo by Kristina Hicks-Hamblin.

Gather your supplies – you will need a pair of sanitized sharp pruners, sanitized potting soil, a small nursery pot for each cut, and a spray bottle.

Pour the potting soil into your pot, leaving an inch of space at the top under the rim.

With your pruner, cut 4 to 5 inches from one of the branches – this is a good opportunity to shape your tree if it has longer branches than the others.

Remove the needles from the lower inch or two of the cup.

To improve your chances of successful rooting, you can apply a rooting hormone to the cutting tip, such as Olivia’s Cloning Gel,available from Arbico Organics.

A close up square image of three pots of Olivia's Cloning Gel on a white background.

Olivia Clone Freeze

Make a hole in the potting soil and stick the cutout in, then use your spray bottle to wet the potting soil so it’s moist but not soggy.

Cover your potted cutting with a clear plastic bag and secure it with a rubber band to keep the tent moist. Alternatively, you can place the cuttings in a greenhouse or terrarium.

Check the cutting daily and water with a plant mister when the soil surface is dry. Watering with a sprinkler is a good way to avoid waterlogging.

Growing one of these evergreens from a cutting is a slow process and you will need to be patient and remember to check it daily.

Therefore, it may not be the best test to do with children or novice gardeners who could use a boost in the form of quick results.

A close up horizontal image of a hand from the left of the frame holding a small black plastic pot containing a cutting taken from a Norfolk Island pine tree, pictured on a soft focus background.Photo by Kristina Hicks-Hamblin.

Once the cutting is rooted, you will feel resistance if you try – gently – to pull it out of the potting soil.

Rooted cuttings can be transplanted into containers and maintained as houseplants.

Read our full guide to Norfolk Island pine propagation here.

how to grow

These plants are quite pleasant indoor plants to maintain.

However, to keep your plants looking their best and keep them indoors for as long as possible, you should learn some of the best care procedures for this tropical gymnosperm.

Choose a factory

Some Norfolk Island pines are painted green or sparkle during the holidays – when they are most widely available.

If you want to keep your plants as houseplants for the long term, be sure to buy them in their natural state,are notpaint or glitter, which can interfere with the plant’s ability to photosynthesize.

A close up top down horizontal image of the leaves of a Norfolk Island pine tree growing in a container.

Here are some other things to look for:

  • Inspect plants for signs of pests before buying.
  • Choose the size that best suits your living space.
  • Choose plants that don’t have brown or yellow foliage, or foliage that looks dry or wilted.

Then it’s about giving your new conversion everything it needs to thrive.

Light

When you bring home a living Christmas tree, choose a good place for it to live. These plants will tolerate full sun to partial shade, but when grown indoors they grow best with plenty of bright, indirect light.

If you can provide your plants with a few hours of direct sunlight in the morning followed by bright, indirect light the rest of the day, it will be incredibly happy.

I located my apartment from a bright south-facing window and a few steps from the west window. It seems quite comfortable in this position – but in the summer when the light from these two windows is at its warmest, I use sheers to cover both, which makes the light more diffused.

If you want to keep your Norfolk Island pine in full sun, be sure to transition to such harsh light gradually.

Wondering if you can grow plants indoors in low light conditions? As mentioned above, this species tolerates partial shade, but with less light than themtend to have long legs.

The more indirect light you can give the plant, the more it will help keep its needles looking fresh and beautiful.

On the other hand, too much direct sunlight cancause leaves to whiten- and your needle may be yellow.

And to prevent your plants from curling up, give them a quarter of a week to get full sun from all angles.

If there isn’t much light entering your home, you may need a grow light to help make your pine tree bright enough.

To learn more, read our comprehensive guide togrow the best lights for houseplants and seedlings.

Temperature

One of the mistakes growers make with these houseplants is thinking that because they are evergreens, they are just as cold tolerant as the first plants and shoots growing outdoors.

Many of the surviving Christmas trees have shrunk when left on patios or backyards as temperatures begin to cool.

So keep in mind that these plants are native to tropical climates, and ideally you shouldkeep them above 50°F. Exposure to temperatures below 35°F can kill them.

When kept in average indoor conditions, these plants do well – they likeRange 60-72°F.during the day and slightly cooler at night.

A close up vertical image of a Norfolk Island pine tree in a dark gray pot set on a side table beside a window.Photo by Kristine Lofgren.

Just be sure to avoid placing a live Christmas tree in a drafty location, such as near an exterior door or curtained window.

If you spend time outdoors with pine trees on Norfolk Island during the summer, be aware that it can accelerate the tree’s growth. And don’t forget to bring it back inside when the mercury hits the 50s.

Drink water

While live Christmas trees prefer moist soil, they are quite drought tolerant, as my own Norfolk Pine can attest.

After a stressful year of migration, my tree was neglected and not watered (I’m ashamed to say) for at least two summer months, if not longer.

Its needles were starting to turn brown – including the sprouting ones – and my husband and I both thought it was a garland.

But before demoting itcompost heap, we decide whether we can revive it or not. And surprisingly, it has increased! It quickly begins to produce new bright green foliage and looks rather cheerful and fearless.

A close up horizontal image of a Norfolk Island pine tree with brown leaves, pictured on a soft focus background.Photo by Kristina Hicks-Hamblin.

But just because these plants have an innate drought tolerance doesn’t mean you should overdo it – water them when the top layer of soil seems dry.

If you are an overgrown tree keeper who tends to live on water rather than in water, feel free to go with your living Christmas tree. These plants prefer moist soil, but not soggy soil.

Keeping the soil moist but not soggy depends not only on your watering technique, but also on the potting soil used. (I’ll do that in a moment.)

When it’s time to water your living Christmas tree, pour the water evenly over the soil until it begins to drip from the bottom of the pot.

A close up vertical image of a small Norfolk Island pine tree in a dark gray pot, set on a wooden surface with a watering can to the right of the frame.Photo by Kristine Lofgren.

If your plant has a saucer underneath, be sure to remove any water that gets into it. Like most other houseplants, Norfolk pine does not like getting its feet wet.

Young plants will need more frequent watering than mature plants.

Watering frequency varies with the age of the plant and also varies from home to home, depending on the warmth of your home, your plant’s light levels, and the humidity of the air. ‘air. . To be.

So get to know your plant – stick your finger in the soil and when the top is dry, it’s a good time to water. Try to make it a habit so you don’t neglect your tree and accidentally test its resilience, like I did with mine.

If you’re not sure if you’re watering enough, look for brown spots on the tips of the branches – this usually means the plant is overwatered.

A close up horizontal image of a Norfolk Island pine branch with leaves that are turning brown, pictured on a soft focus background.Photo by Kristina Hicks-Hamblin.

And once the days start to get colder and winter rolls around, your Norfolk pine will need less watering.

Find more watering tips here.

Humidity

As a tropical species,A. heterophyllaappreciate a little extra humidity – often more than is available in our homes when heated in the winter – 50% or more preferred.

If you have to deal with dry air, in the winter or all year round like me, there are several ways to increase the humidity to keep your plants happy and healthy.

A close up horizontal image of various houseplants set on a wooden side table.Photo by Kristine Lofgren.

If you have other houseplants, you can group them with friendly plants. This technique will help increase the relative humidity around all plants.

You might also consider placing a humidifier nearby (this will also help your nasal passages, by the way, if your home is very dry).

Another option is to place your plant on a tray filled with gravel. Fill the tray with water, but make sure the water doesn’t go over the pad to prevent the plant from drawing too much water from the soil.

You can make your own cobblestone tray or buy one. There are also humidity trays that work with mesh rather than pebbles, like this one from Humidi-Grow.

It measures 13.5 x 10.5 inches and it isavailable through Amazon.

Humidi-Grow Humidifier Tray 13.5″ x 10.5″

You can also mist the plant daily with a spray bottle to help increase humidity. Just be sure to spray in the morning to reduce the risk of fungal or bacterial growth, which is more likely when foliage is cool and moist at night.

If you already live in a very humid climate, you may want to avoid adding more humidity to your living space.

But if you have no idea about the level of humidity in your home and want to monitor it to make sure your houseplants are comfortable, you can use a hygrometer, a tool that measures relative humidity.

Hygrometer and mini thermometer

You will find a mini thermometer and hygrometer combo for purchasefrom Goaboa via Amazon.

Fertilizer

Although fertilizing houseplants is generally a good idea, to provide nutrients that they cannot easily collect because their access to soil is rather limited and often easily depleted. , in the case of the Norfolk Island pine, you may want an easier modification.

Here’s why:

If you fertilize regularly, your plants will grow faster. Once it grows enough, it will eventually grow to the size of a houseplant – unless your home has very high ceilings.

Fertilizationtwice a yearcan go a long way in giving your plants the nutrients they need.

A close up horizontal image of a leaf of a Norfolk Island pine tree that has turned a little yellow at the edges, pictured on a soft focus background.

When choosing to fertilize, you should only do so when the plant is actively growing, around March through September.

You can use an all-purpose houseplant fertilizer, which is not as sensitive as some other houseplants to the salt that can build up when fertilizing.

Or you can take a more natural and organic approach, like I do, by using wormwood tea to fertilize your plants. You can do it yourselfvermicomposttea from your worm cake.

But if you haven’t started raising worms yet, you can try this handy way to make worm-infused tea. TeaDrops are tea bags containing ready-to-use dried vermicompost.

TeaDrops Organic Plant Fertilizer

You soak them in room temperature water and then use the resulting “tea” to water and fertilize houseplants.

You will find a pack of 16 maggot infused teasEarthworm Technologies Store is on Amazon.

Development tips

  • Provide indirect light.
  • Well-drained earthen pot.
  • Keep the soil moist but not soggy.

Size and care

One of the advantages of these plants is that they require very little maintenance. However, it would be useful to know some tips for taking care of your plants during the holidays, pruning and repotting.

Holiday care

The average home plant care guide may not include advice on how best todecorateplant.

But since the Norfolk Island pine can be used as a standalone Christmas tree, I thought it best to point out a few additional holiday-related care items.

The branches of these trees are not as sturdy as those of a Frasier fir and will not support the weight of ornaments – so limit your size to heavy and light Christmas decorations.

Bows, ribbons and light glass embellishments are good choices.

A close up horizontal image of a hand from the right of the frame placing a small Christmas ornament onto a Norfolk Island pine tree growing indoors.Photo by Kristine Lofgren.

And while your living Christmas tree might look glamorous nestled next to the fireplace as part of your holiday decor, it won’t appreciate the extreme heat that can ensue when a fire breaks out.

In addition, when placed on the exterior wall of the house, the chimney can cause cold winds. So be sure to place this tropical evergreen away from the fireplace to avoid not only heat but also potential cold drafts.

To cut

The lower branches of these houseplants will brown and die as the plants grow. This is a normal process – you can remove lower dead branches with a pair oftrim or prune the garden.

Also, while you’re working on your watering schedule, your plants may show annoyance when they don’t get enough water by seeing a branch tip or two turn brown. Please cut them.

A close up horizontal image of a pair of pruners cutting the end off a Christmas tree leaf, pictured on a soft focus background.Photo by Kristina Hicks-Hamblin.

However, it is best to avoid pruning trees that turn green as this can, as one person writes atRoyal Horticultural Societyput it, “ruin the shape of the tree.”

Repotting

As for fertilizer, your choice of potting — or not — will contribute to its growth rate and the final size it reaches.

If you hope to have a large tree that will make an impact in a large space, repot your Norfolk Island pine every year or two, transferring it to the next larger pot.

On the other hand, if you want to bring your Christmas tree to life in a more compact format,do not replace it with a larger container.

You can replace the plant’s soil with fresh, fresh potting soil if you wish, but put the plant back in the same size pot as possible.

A close up vertical image of a man on the left of the frame adding soil to a white pot after repotting a Norfolk Island pine tree.

No matter how often you repot, make sure the pot has drainage holes. Otherwise, its roots will become waterlogged and the plant may die from root rot.

There is another case where repotting can benefit your tree – if your living Christmas tree has been waterlogged in the past, repotting in a new patch and cutting out rotten roots will benefit. .

This plant can grow in soil with a slightly acidic, neutral or slightly alkaline pH. It grows in chalky sandy soils and tolerates saline soils due to its coastal origin.

When repotting, usewell-draining potting soilhave sand – the sand will help drain water and provide stability, so the trunk does not tilt.

I like Soil Mender 109 potting mix for this purpose. It contains coconut fiber to drain and retain water, sand to drain and stabilize, and it isno peat.

A close up vertical image of the packaging of Soil Mender's potting mix pictured on a white background.

Soil Mender 109 Potting Soil

It is available for purchase in a variety of pack sizesat Arbico Organics.

Or buy

You can buy these plants in a variety of sizes, from tabletop size to floor size.

When buying one of these festive evergreens, remember that the more time and fertilizer you give them outdoors, and the more often you repot, the faster they will grow – and choose your size accordingly.

Small

Ideal for small spaces, this sapling Christmas tree can be placed on a shelf or entryway table, or brighten up your home office.

Costa Farms offers one that is only 10 inches tall and comes in a red pot with a red snowflake decoration. You canbuy it through Home Depot.

A close up vertical image of a small Norfolk Island pine tree with Christmas decorations outside a residence.

10 inch Norfolk Island pine live in red pot with ornament

And if just one isn’t enough to decorate your vacation, you can also purchase an eight-pack of these tropical evergreens in 12-inch sizes.

Each mini Norfolk tree in this set comes with a red or yellow pot lid, as well as matching decorations and toppers.

A close up horizontal image of eight small Christmas trees in decorative packaging pictured on a white background.

Set of 8 12″ live Norfolk Island pines in red and yellow pots.

You’ll find these eight animated twelve-inch Christmas trees, also from Costa Farms,at Walmart.

Medium

A medium-sized Norfolk Island pine will give you many options. You can use it as a focal point on your dining table or as a Christmas tree in your tiny house.

A close up square image of a Norfolk Island Pine tree in a black container pictured on a white background.

24-30″ Norfolk Island Pine Live in 9.25″ Planter

United Nursery offers a plant that is 2 to 2 and a half feet tall and comes in a 9.25 inch grow pot.

You will find thisMedium-sized factory at Walmart.

Awesome

If you have an empty corner that could use a tree ready for the holidays, a large Norfolk Island fir tree can stand on the floor and make a lovely accent – ​​or act as a stand for a Christmas tree.

Norfolk Island pines live 4 feet tall in a 10 inch pot

You can buy a 4ft tall Norfolk Island pinefrom Costa Farms via Amazon.

It comes in a 10 inch pot decorated in red, with ready made white snowflakes to adorn its limbs.

Trees

For something a little different, why not try a Norfolk Island pine? This group of three plants in a small pot stands 11 to 13 inches tall and has been pruned by hand.

A close up vertical image of a small Norfolk Island pine in a bonsai container pictured on a light yellow background.

Bonsai across Norfolk

You can find treesavailable at Bonsai Boy.

pest control

Part of the no-show Christmas tree care routine is that they are not very susceptible to pests or disease. However, there are some insects and pathogens you need to watch out for – be careful.

Insect

Although insects are never a problem for your plants, here are the most common ones to watch out for:

mealybugs

Scale insects are a common pest of houseplants, and they can sometimes attack your Norfolk Island pines just as they can the infestation.Cactus.

A close up horizontal image of mealybugs infesting a branch of a houseplant pictured on a dark background.

Easily recognizable, mealybugs appear like white cotton on your plants – especially on its branches.

When these pests appear, they attach themselves to your plant and suck nutrients out of it, weakening it, causing the plant to stunt its growth and eventually kill its parts.

You can control a small scale insect infestation by rubbing them with alcohol-soaked paper towels.

For more serious problems, neem oil can be used. Simply follow the manufacturer’s instructions for applying this product.

A close up square image of two plastic bottles of Monterey Neem Oil pictured on a white background.

Monterey Neem Oil

You can find Monterey neem oil available forbuy from Arbico Organics.

Learn more about controlling a mealybug infestation here..

Report

Scales look like raised brown spots on your plants – they don’t show up as easily as insects.

Like mealybugs, scales will suck nutrients from your houseplants, weakening them and eventually killing them.

To treat scabs on these plants, you can use the same technique described for scale insects – depending on the severity of the infection, use rubbing alcohol or apply neem oil.

Find more scaly insect repellent tips here.

Mites

Spiders are also common pests of houseplants and can even attack Norfolk Island pines. Spiders tend to be more of a problem in the winter when the air is dry, which gives you another good reason to monitor the relative humidity around your plants.

You may notice speckled yellow spots on the tree’s foliage. When severely infected, you will begin to see cobwebs surrounding the foliage.

Spider mites also suck nutrients from your houseplants, weakening and potentially killing them.

To deal with mite problems, first wipe them off with a damp paper towel. Then treat as needed with rubbing alcohol or neem oil.

Learn more about dust mite control here.

Sick

With good care, you won’t encounter disease on your living Christmas tree. If you notice discoloration of your tree’s foliage, here are some issues to look for:

Anthracnose disease

Anthracnose is a disease caused by fungi,Colletotrichum derridis.

When your living Christmas tree is infected with anthracnose, you will notice dead needles. Looking closer, you will see black areas on the needle, which are fungi.

Mushrooms thrive in moist conditions, so be sure to water plants at ground level – don’t overwater them. And if you’re misting, do it in the morning so water doesn’t sit on the foliage overnight when temperatures are cooler.

Neem oil is an organic fungicide that can be used to treat anthracnose.

Root rot

Some signs of root rot include stunted branches, wilting and death.

If you have a Norfolk Island pine growing in poorly drained soil, in a pot with no drainage holes, or if you like it too much (i.e. water), root rot could be a problem.

When your plant’s roots stay in the ground too long, they can’t get oxygen and begin to die, which prevents them from carrying water to the foliage. Ironically, this can cause the plant to die from dehydration.

Additionally, bacteria and fungi can multiply in this waterlogged environment, causing further damage (and further infection).

To treat root rot, fix everything that’s going on:

If the soil does not drain well, replace the soil. If the pot doesn’t have a drainage hole, take it out.

If repotting seems like the best option, don’t convert your plant to a larger pot. During repotting, you can cut off the rotten roots of the plant – just be sure to use sterilized secateurs for this.

Molds

Have you had a pest problem on Norfolk Island pines lately? Bed bugs, scale insects and scale insects secrete honey, which can make way formold, another fungal problem.

To treat mold, which is often caused by many species of fungi at once, you can apply neem oil, the same product you would apply to get rid of minor pests in the first place.

best use

A young Norfolk Island pine 1 to 2 feet tall can be used to decorate a desk, counter or mantelpiece. A taller tree can be a great alternative to a Christmas tree that’s been cut down – and you won’t have to put it on the sidewalk when the holidays are over.

And like many other evergreen conifers, this tropical plant can be turned into an ornamental plant.

If you have cats and dogs, you can introduce this plant into your home without worrying that it will be a source of danger for your animal.ASPCA Poisonous and Non-Poisonous Plantslist, it’s not malicious.

A horizontal image of an indoor scene with books, a booze cabinet, and a variety of different houseplants.Photo by Kristine Lofgren.

In the United States, these evergreens can be grown outdoors in Hawaii, parts of California, and southern Florida – but beware, these evergreens are not tolerant.Storm, tornadoes or other local weather phenomena that can cause strong gusts of wind.

Quick Reference Development Guide

Plant type: evergreen conifers Maintenance: Short
Root for: norfolk island The type of soil: sand humus
Hardness (USDA Zone): 10-11 Soil pH: 6.1-7.3
Exposure: Full sun to partial shade Floor drainage: Good drainage
Height: 5-8 feet (indoor plants), 100-200 (outdoors) Companion planting: Amaryllis, Christmas cactus, poinsettias
Lan: 3-5 feet (indoor plants), 20-25 feet (outdoors) Uses: Indoor bonsai, holiday home decoration, ornamental bonsai in zone 10-11
Rate of growth: 3-6 inches per year (houseplant) Ordered: Pinals
Water demand: Average Family: Araucariaceae family
Tolerance: Humidity, dryness, salt Spend: Araucaria
Insects Aphids, mealybugs, scale insects, spider mites; Anthracnose, leaf spot, root rot, downy mildew Species: heterophylly

Your caretaker’s Christmas tree

Now you need to be well prepared to keep your living Christmas tree happy and healthy all year round.

Remember to give it plenty of indirect but bright light, make sure its soil drains well, and keep it moist but not soggy.

And don’t forget that you can help your plant determine its growth rate, depending on how often you fertilize and repot.

Although my own Norfolk Island pine tree looks a lot like Charlie Brown’s Christmas tree, it’s a treasured member of my family’s botanical collection and I wouldn’t dream of getting rid of it just because it is a bit grumpy.

And you? Do you have a beloved Norfolk pine in your home? What is the story behind your tree? Let us know in the comments section below and feel free to share photos!

If you like moreindoor plant at your homeWhile on vacation, here are some other guidelines that might help:

  • How to Grow and Care for Poinsettias
  • How to plant and care for a Christmas cactus
  • How to grow and care for amaryllis flowers

Photo by Kristina Hicks-Hamblin and Kristine Lofgren © Ask the Experts, LLC. COPYRIGHT REGISTERED. See our T&Cs for more details. Product photos via Arbico Organics, Costa Farms, Goabroa, Humidi-Gro, Jump Start, Monterey, Olivia’s Cloning Gel, Soil Mender, TeaDrops and United Nursery. Unverified photo: Shutterstock.

Popular questions about how to grow norfolk island pine

how to grow norfolk island pine?

Norfolk pine trees prefer several hours of direct, bright light, such as the type of light that can be found in a south-facing window, but they will also tolerate full indirect, bright light as well. Water your Norfolk Island pine when the top of the soil feels dry to the touch.

Can I put my Norfolk Island pine outside?

Norfolk Island pines are often grown as houseplants, but in your gardening region they can also be planted outdoors. Indoors, provide bright light and average to cool temperatures. Water regularly from spring through autumn, but sparingly during the winter months.

Where do Norfolk pines grow best?

A: A tropical tree, Norfolk Island pine (Araucaria heterophylla) doesn’t like frosty weather, and can’t be grown outdoors in USDA Hardiness Zone 9 or colder. They’re best suited to subtropical areas, such as South Florida and Hawaii.

How fast do Norfolk Island pines grow?

2 feet per year
Recognizing Norfolk Potential Along parts of the California Coast, Norfolk Island pines grow 100 feet or taller, stretching up to 60 feet wide and growing up to 2 feet per year.

Can you grow Norfolk Island pine from cutting?

Norfolk Island pines grow readily from clippings, or cuttings, which root best when started in summer. The cuttings perform best when treated with rooting hormone and will quickly put on new growth.

Does Norfolk Island pine have deep roots?

Norfolk pines have shallow root systems, which means they often blow over during storms. Plant a Norfolk pine in an area that offers some protection from high winds.

How cold can a Norfolk pine tolerate?

35 degrees F.
First thing to keep in mind with the care of Norfolk pines is that they are not cold hardy. They are a tropical plant and cannot tolerate temperatures below 35 degrees F. (1 C.). For many parts of the country, the Norfolk Island pine tree cannot be planted outside year-round.

Can I put my Norfolk Pine outside in the summer?

During the summer, Norfolk Island pine can enjoy a vacation outdoors. Place it in a protected spot where it isn’t cooked by the direct sun and water at least once a week. If your plant gets too big for its container, summer is also a great time to transplant to a larger pot.

Do Norfolk pines like to be root bound?

These trees don’t tolerate soggy roots, so use a soil with vermiculite to promote drainage. Researchers have actually determined the ideal depth for repotting Norfolk Island pines. A study found the best growth and sturdiness when the top of the transplanted pine’s root ball was situated 2 to 3 inches (5-8 cm.)

Do Norfolk pines like coffee grounds?

Plants that prefer more acidic soil (such as African violets, Impatiens, Norfolk Island pines, Phalaenopsis orchids, and Dieffenbachia) seem to respond well to a weekly watering with coffee.

Are Norfolk pines easy to grow?

Norfolk Island pine trees are easy to care for indoors or outdoors, as long as they enjoy enough humidity.

How do you fertilize a Norfolk Pine?

Apply a balanced (20-20-20) liquid fertilizer to Norfolk Island Pine every two (2) weeks during the growing period. In the summer, especially if grown outdoors, feed plants with an acid fertilizer such as rhododendron food as the high nitrogen concentration stimulates better foliage growth.

Can you top a Norfolk Island pine?

Just as topping a pine tree will ruin its pyramidal shape, the same would happen with your Norfolk Island pine. The branches arrange themselves in whorls around the trunk. Topping above one of these branches will more or less keep the tree from growing any taller.

Can you root a Norfolk pine in water?

Pour water onto the medium and stir it around until it feels moderately moist throughout. Let the excess water drain from the holes at the bottom of the pot for 10-to-15 minutes before potting the Norfolk pine cutting.

Can you grow pine from clippings?

Growing conifers from cuttings isn’t as easy as rooting most shrubs and flowers, but it can definitely be done. Plant several pine tree cuttings to increase your chances of success.

Video tutorials about how to grow norfolk island pine

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Next up in the houseplant series I cover how to grow Norfolk Island Pine. This is a tropical conifer/evergreen tree which grows well under the typical houseplant conditions. You should be growing yours just fine if you give it very bright light and water when the surface starts to dry. Fertilizer and soil options are also covered.

Yescom 225 grow light panels (buy either white or the Red \u0026 Blue option:

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Grow light bulb:

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Foxfarm grow big fertilizer:

-https://foxfarm.com/product/grow-big-liquid-fertilizer

Espoma products:

-https://www.espoma.com/

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It’s around that time when you’ll Find Norfolk Island Pine in almost every store for the holidays 🙂 Just though i would share some tips on how i keep mine alive 🙂

keep the soil moist but not wet

needs good humidity

keep it warm… if you live in a cold climate it will not survive freezing temps on your door step.

Check out my Facebook page –

-http://www.facebook.com/#!/PlantznThings?fref=ts

Follow Me on Twitter @PlantzNThings –

-https://twitter.com/PlantzNThings

Video editing Software used for this video is (VideoStudio Pro x4) By Corel

Intro created using www.flixpress.com

keywords: #gardening, #growing, #Norfolkislandpine, #pine, #Norfolkpine, #Araucariaheterophylla, #tree

Norfolk island pine for more information

Norfolk island pine

-https://amzn.to/2IEDojw

-http://www.growplants.org/growing/norfolk-island-pine

Norfolk island pine – growing and care

Alternative names: Norfolk pine, Araucaria heterophylla s

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Norfolk Island Pine Care with Northlawn Flower Farm

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