Top 17 how to build a built in bookcase into a wall

Below is the best information and knowledge about how to build a built in bookcase into a wall compiled and compiled by the hkfindall.com team, along with other related topics such as:: how to build a bookshelf into a wall, built-in bookshelf wall, built-in bookcase ideas, how to build built in bookshelves around fireplace, cheap diy built-in bookshelves, built-in bookshelves kit, diy built in bookshelves with desk, custom built-in bookshelves.

how to build a built in bookcase into a wall

Image for keyword: how to build a built in bookcase into a wall

The most popular articles about how to build a built in bookcase into a wall

How to Build Recessed Bookcases | HGTV

  • Author: www.hgtv.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (24200 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Build Recessed Bookcases | HGTV 1. Measure the complete work area including wall, floor and ceiling dimension. Mark a level line where the recessed bookcases will go into the wall. Our …

  • Match the search results: 3. Use a hammer to enlarge the inspection hole and open the wall. With the circular saw, cut the rough opening for the bookcase. Clear away any plaster behind the wall. Change the depth of the blade on the drive to cut completely through the wall. Use the hammer to clear away the remaining wood. You…

  • Quote from the source:

How to Build a Built-in Bookcase – The Family Handyman

  • Author: www.familyhandyman.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (8466 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Build a Built-in Bookcase – The Family Handyman If there’s no window, just build the built in bookshelves into the … can be placed wall to wall as shown or can stop halfway into a room …

  • Match the search results: You can build this built-in bookcase by following our clear drawings and step-by-step photos, or use these techniques to modify the dimensions for your own space. The partitions shown in Photos 8 and 9 can be placed wall to wall as shown or can stop halfway into a room and then finish off on the ope…

  • Quote from the source:

Library wall to wall bookcases – Bookcase Plans – Sawdust Girl®

  • Author: sawdustgirl.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (36078 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Library wall to wall bookcases – Bookcase Plans – Sawdust Girl® Bookcase Plans · Step 1: Mark and Drill · Step 2: Install fixed shelves to one side · Step 3: Attach second side · Step 4: Install cleats · Step 5: …

  • Match the search results: These plans utilized the most basic and simplest cabinet building techniques.  You can modify this plan to utilize other building methods if you have the tools to implement them.  Check out my Cabinet Building 101 eBook for all my cabinet building tips, techniques and instructions for different buil…

  • Quote from the source:

How to Build a Custom Built-in Bookcase – Plank and Pillow

  • Author: plankandpillow.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (21023 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Build a Custom Built-in Bookcase – Plank and Pillow In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how I built this bookcase. … You’ll want to make sure you are screwing and nailing into your wall studs.

  • Match the search results: I love this tutorial. We’re going to build this for our office. We’re new to woodworking so excuse me if this is a silly question, but how did you secure the actual shelves within the bookcase? Also, do you actually have a tutorial for the doors because I’d like to know how to build them? Thanks so …

  • Quote from the source:

How to Build a Bookcase: Step-by-Step Woodworking Plans

  • Author: www.popularmechanics.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (28384 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Build a Bookcase: Step-by-Step Woodworking Plans In-the-wall bookcases are elegant, but they can be difficult and expensive to … The Right Wood: Birch veneer plywood is ideal for building …

  • Match the search results: The Right Wood: Birch veneer plywood is ideal for building bookcases, and it was affordable at $45 per 4 x 8-ft. sheet. The mahogany was $7 per board foot–and certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.

  • Quote from the source:

How to Build Built-in Bookshelves: Your Guide | Book Riot

  • Author: bookriot.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (37539 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How to Build Built-in Bookshelves: Your Guide | Book Riot Find a plain wall that you want to transform into a wall of books. · Measure the length, width, and height of the wall under consideration.

  • Match the search results:

  • Quote from the source:

DIY Built-In Bookshelves – The Home Depot

  • Author: www.homedepot.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (1005 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about DIY Built-In Bookshelves – The Home Depot Built-in bookshelves are a stylish and functional storage solution in any home. They transform empty wall space into a focal point to frame your personal …

  • Match the search results:
    Reference #18.4e33431b.1648646020.86c26687

  • Quote from the source:

How To Build Built-in Bookshelves – Kitchen Infinity

  • Author: kitcheninfinity.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (1188 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How To Build Built-in Bookshelves – Kitchen Infinity Measure the space you want to build your bookshelf in · Mark a rectangle on the wall where you want the bookcase · Cut the plywood with a circular …

  • Match the search results: The good news is that it’s possible to build your built-in bookshelves at home. The bad news is that the cost could easily run into hundreds of dollars for simple projects if you don’t know what you’re doing.

  • Quote from the source:

The Affordable Way to Build Built-In Bookshelves – Roots …

  • Author: rootsandwingsfurniture.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (3276 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about The Affordable Way to Build Built-In Bookshelves – Roots … How to build custom built-in bookshelves for your home. … going up each side wall, screwing it into the studs of the walls on each side.

  • Match the search results: I used a 1×12 going up each side wall, screwing it into the studs of the walls on each side.  I cut a bunch of 1×2’s to length and added these as cleats in the corners – using these allows you to nail into the top and sides of each shelf.  I just used a little wood gl…

  • Quote from the source:

My DIY Built-In Bookshelves Wall Is Finished!! (Before & After)

  • Author: www.addicted2decorating.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (8636 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about My DIY Built-In Bookshelves Wall Is Finished!! (Before & After) I finished my built-in bookshelves wall in my living room!! Here’s the Before & After pictorial for the whole wall bookcase project!

  • Match the search results: Kristi, how exciting to look on your blog this morning and find that you’ve finished your bookcase wall! It’s beautiful! I would imagine you fell asleep last night with a HUGE smile on your face and a sigh of satisfaction for a job WELL DONE!! I found your blog a couple of weeks ago whil…

  • Quote from the source:

Building Built-In Bookshelves, The Saga – Things I Made Today

  • Author: www.thingsimadetoday.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (22121 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Building Built-In Bookshelves, The Saga – Things I Made Today Because our bump out walls were not sizable I got away without harnessing them directly into our cement floor. This was a definite plus since …

  • Match the search results: For hardware I used good old fashioned wood screws so they could get through our anchor pieces, into the walls, and then into those studs I built behind the drywall back in Phase 2. Finally, it was time for the finishing touches. I put the bottom base board into place, as well as the facing piece of…

  • Quote from the source:

Building Built-In Bookshelves, The Saga – Things I Made Today

  • Author: www.thingsimadetoday.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (29098 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Building Built-In Bookshelves, The Saga – Things I Made Today Because our bump out walls were not sizable I got away without harnessing them directly into our cement floor. This was a definite plus since …

  • Match the search results: Because the shelves needed to be 10 inches deep, my first task was building out the walls on the side to support the length and load the shelves would have. To get the existing bumped out side wall ready, I striped off the drywall. For this part of the job, I used a simple claw hammer to pry, along …

  • Quote from the source:

DIY Built in Basement Bookcase Wall Reveal – Thrifty Decor …

  • Author: www.thriftydecorchick.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (1670 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about DIY Built in Basement Bookcase Wall Reveal – Thrifty Decor … After I got them in place I installed them into the wall and into each other: building bookcases with kitchen cabinets.

  • Match the search results: Wow! What a beautiful job you did on the basement build in. I have questions though as I am a very detail oriented person haha. 1. Did the wall paper go directly to the wall on the shelves? If not what wood did you back it work?2. How did you mount it to the wall?3. How did you get the beginning of …

  • Quote from the source:

Building a Built-in Bookshelf Wall – View Along the Way

  • Author: www.viewalongtheway.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (31186 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Building a Built-in Bookshelf Wall – View Along the Way How to build a wall-to-wall bookshelf in your home, with photos, … We finished the office built-in wall. … And started building the cabinet boxes:

  • Match the search results: Hi! I was looking for plans for a bookcase for my office/study and here it is! Beautiful! Do you have a photo of the finished room from the outside? Was the bookcase put on the right side or on the wall facing you as you go into the room? I’m trying to decide what is the prettiest and mos…

  • Quote from the source:

Building a Built-in Bookcase – Extreme How To

  • Author: extremehowto.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (30253 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Building a Built-in Bookcase – Extreme How To The Writings on the Wall · 4×8 1/2” plywood for back · 12” edge-glued side panels · 4×8 stain-grade 3/4” birch plywood for shelves · 1x oak hardwood …

  • Match the search results: This particular case was built in a partition wall located in a finished basement and adjacent to a split-level staircase. Before removing any wall studs, make sure the wall is not load-bearing. Exterior load-bearing walls are not appropriate for built-in cases because removal of the wall eliminates…

  • Quote from the source:

How I Built Custom Built -ins All by Myself! – Crystel …

  • Author: crystelmontenegro.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (28937 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about How I Built Custom Built -ins All by Myself! – Crystel … After I removed the baseboard from the wall, I built some simple boxes … My shelves here are 36 inches, so I factored into the build some …

  • Match the search results: Great question! It really depends on your wall. You will want to locate where the studs are in your wall and for sure you will have two that meet up in the corner that you can screw into. In that case you will just need to screw into the wood a tiny bit, then angle the screw whichever direction you …

  • Quote from the source:

30 Ways to DIY Your Own Built In Shelves – Homedit

  • Author: www.homedit.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (5717 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 3 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 1 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about 30 Ways to DIY Your Own Built In Shelves – Homedit This design from instructables is nice and simple, custom made to be recessed into the wall between two studs. 3. A Built-In Bookcase with …

  • Match the search results: Many wall shelves still stick out from the walls in some ways, which is why we love these recessed wall shelves. They are ideal for a small bathroom where you probably lack storage space but don’t want to risk hitting your head on more shelving. Better Homes & Gardens shares a full tutorial on h…

  • Quote from the source:

Multi-read content how to build a built in bookcase into a wall

House

How to build an integrated library

Updated: August 27, 2019

No complicated wood joints, no complicated engineering – just glue, screw and nail the pieces together

Next projects

built-in bookcase built in bookshelves

The handyman’s family

Learn how to use inexpensive materials like birch plywood and standard ornaments to build a classic wooden bookcase.

From the DIY experts at Family Handyman magazine

You May Also Like: TBD

TimeSeveral days
ComplicationIntermediate
AssessChange

Integrated Library Project Overview

Photo 1: Measure the room to place a shelf for the window seat
Measure the width of your room and the height of the ceiling. Also check the position of the window. Our room was almost 12 feet by 8 feet. ceilings and windows very close to the center. If there are no windows, just place the built-in shelves in the center. Find more shelving designs and plans you’d like to see.

You’ll love my old hometown library. Its beautiful paneled shelves are just as inspiring as the books they hold in their hands. This beautiful bookcase has the same classic elements – curved shelves, columnar dividers and crown moldings. Now you can add them to your living room or study room with this simple design bookcase project.

You can build this built-in bookcase by following our clear drawings and step-by-step photos, or use these techniques to resize your own space. The partitions shown in photos 8 and 9 can be placed against the wall as shown or can stop halfway in a room and end on the open side. Or you can extend the length by building more partitions and shelves.

This built-in bookcase project is made from solid wood plywood, 2x6s, hardwood planks, and standard moldings available at home centers and lumber yards. We chose birch and plywood with maple moldings, then used gel polish to give the project a cherry wood look. You’ll notice we’ve also removed the stains to accentuate the vintage look. The materials we use are listed on the shopping list (see additional information) and shown in figure A. You can pre-assemble almost any component for a modular project, these in your garage or shop and bring them into the room to put them together.

Figure A: Library detail

This detailed building plan drawing shows how the built-in bookcase is constructed. See additional information for a printable PDF of Figure A, as well as the full list of cuts and shopping list.

Figure A shows how to build a built-in bookcase.

Video: DIY a place to hide old books

Sandwich type partitions

Photo 2: Assemble the sides
Glue and nail the plywood sides (B) to the straight 2×6 edges (A) torn off 4 inches apart. Leave 2 in. back spacing and 3/4-in. space in front. Then glue and nail the front 3/4″. piece of plywood (C) so that it is flush with the sides. Make sure all four bulkheads are exactly the same and make sure all pieces are cut to 1-1/4″. Smaller than your ceiling height. Allow the glue to dry a few hours before assembly.Photo 3: Drill a hole for a shelf pin
Measure 12 inches from the top of your bulkhead and drill 1/4 inch. 1/2 inch deep holes, 2 inches each to accommodate shelf latches. Ensure accuracy by creating a drill guide from a strip of steel, available at your hardware store. Mark one end with paint so you always know which end goes up, then drill three 1/16″ holes. the holes are evenly spaced along the length so you can use brad nails to secure the guide to your work surface. You can also purchase pre-written instructions at home centers or woodworking stores, or simply use bulletin board strips.Base details
Tighten the 12 inch steel drill guide. from bottom to top.Instructions for drilling and pinning brackets
Score and pierce the strip with 1/4-in. Twist a little and you have a great fixture that you can use for future projects.

Cut your plywood lengthwise to the dimensions in the cut list (see Additional Information) to cover your exterior siding. Equip your circular saw with a new 40 tooth fine kerf carbide blade. Use a long cutting guide attached to the plywood to guide your saw for straight cuts. Also rip straight 8 feet. 2×6 seconds at 4 inches. the width of your table saw for the core of each partition.REMARK:Buy your 2x6s about a week in advance and bring them inside to dry and adjust. Some may warp or twist as they acclimate to the dry indoor environment, so buy a few more just in case.

Assemble the partitions on a flat surface as shown in Figure 2, then set them aside to allow the glue to dry. After the glue dries, drill a 1/4″ hole. holes for the shelf legs as shown in Figure 3.

Note at 2 in. space at the back of the sandwich. It’s primordial. It will allow you to slide the partitions over the slats that attach to the wall to make room, as shown in photo 7.POINT:The extra 1/2 inch space between the opening in the wall and the recess in the partition makes it easier to wire low voltage lights into bookcase slots. We only store books, so lighting is not necessary.

Save time: Pre-assemble the shelves while gluing the partitions

Photo 4: Build the shelves
Glue and 1/2 in. nails. a thick strip of hardwood on the back of the shelf (E) and 1 1/8″ trim on the front (F). The 18-gauge pneumatic nail gun is worth buying or renting for this task. You can nail the array as you align it without risking it moving, plus you’ll complete the nailing in less than a tenth of the time it would take for conventional nailing.

While the glue dries on the deflectors, you should have the other pieces cut and ready to assemble. Start with the shelves. By measuring the piece in photo 1 you will have a good idea of ​​the length of the shelf. Make them all about an inch long and then cut them for an exact fit. By making the shelves a little longer, you don’t have to line up the moldings on the front and back of the shelf perfectly when gluing and nailing them together. Also save time by forming an assembly line.REMARK:Do not make these racks longer than 42 inches or they may sag significantly. Our bookcase is 39 inches long.

1/2 in. The anti-sag patch glued to the back of the rack is not an inventory item, but you can craft it on a table saw. First cut 1-1/2 inch wide strips from a wider board. Then angle that piece all the way to the end and cut 3/4 in. width down 1/2 inch. This step is called remodeling and can be tricky because the room is narrow. Use a push rod to keep your fingers away from the blade. If it’s beyond your adventurous spirit, have the sawmill staff cut it for a small fee and stick to the fun parts of the project. And don’t forget, while you’re recreating (or someone else is recreating), create the Q parts.

The molded front of the rack (5/8″ thick and 1-1/8″ wide) covers the uncomfortable plywood edge and also stiffens the rack. This cast is from a local family center. Match it to the profile shown in Figure A, or feel free to use any similar configuration with the same dimensions.

Draw curved hooks using the grid method

Photo 5: Cut the brackets
Trace the supports (K) from the dimension chart in figure A and cut them carefully with a jigsaw. Smooth the curve with 100 grit sandpaper, then 150 grit sandpaper.

Mark your first support (K) on a 1×8 piece. First lay out 1 in. square grid on 1×8, then mark the intersections of the shape with the grid and draw a line connecting the points. Once the lines are drawn, cut out the shape with a jigsaw and use your first cut as a template for the rest. Smooth the curve with a drum grinder or sanding block.

The sides of the partitions are like super narrow front frames on the cabinets

Photo 6: Construction of the faces of the partitions
Cut the long pickets (G) from the face frame and nail 8d to the short rails (H and J). Use a drill to make a pilot hole slightly smaller than the diameter of the nail. Place the nails and then fill the cavities with suitable putty.

Because they are so narrow and do not support the weight of real cabinet top frames, you can simply nail the face frame members together as shown in Figure 6 and Figure A. Once they are nailed down, you’ll need to sand down the front and the back sides are completely flat so they sit nicely on the front of the deflector. The tool of choice for this is a random orbital grinder. You can start with 80 grit paper and finish with 150 grit paper.

Glue and screw the partition to your wall

Photo 7: Attach the wall stickers
Secure the wall to your drywall with dowels and construction glue. We used an anchor screw with a 3 in. Number 8 flathead screws. Use a level to get the first one perfectly, then use your tape measure to place the rest.

In this article, we’ll assume you have wood or tile floors, but if you have carpet, you’ll need to roll it up, remove the release liner, then stretch and cut it afterwards. We’ve also assumed that most of you have drywall over wood studs, but if you don’t, use the right anchor for your wall, whether it’s concrete, brick or plaster. If you have drywall with a wooden frame, you probably won’t hit a nail when trying to screw the divider panels into the wall (picture 7).

Before attaching the wall openings, screw a 1×2 opening in the ceiling so that the front edge is 10-1/2 inches from the back wall. This liner serves two purposes: It helps support the partition and acts as support for the membrane (Photo 9). Our ceiling spacers run perpendicular to the wall, so we can get a solid connection to the ceiling every 16 inches (your spacers can be centered at 24 inches). If the spacers run parallel to the back wall, you will need to use anchors and construction adhesive.

Next, drill four 3/16″ holes. diameter holes along each wall bracing, pull the nailing wire in place, then drive nails through the holes to mark anchor locations in the drywall. Screw in your wall anchor bars, then apply construction glue to the back of the adhesive and screw it to the wall. Measure the top and bottom of the next track to make sure they are parallel. Install the rest the same way.REMARK:Keep end wall 1-1/8 inches from adjacent side walls.

Slide the baffles over the openings in the wall and screw them in place

Photo 8: Suggestion of column partitions in the right position
Secure the partitions in the slots with 2 inches. screws (3 and 6 inches from the ceiling and floor, respectively). They will then be hidden by the padding above and below the base of the bookcase. Use a square frame to attach the bulkheads perpendicular to the back wall, then attach them to the ceiling with a 2-in. steel corner bracket.Photo 9: Installation of the shield
Cut each piece of fascia (P) to fit snugly between the deflectors. Cut and fit the spacers (N). Screw to ceiling with 1-5/8″ wood or deck screws.

Bring the partitions into the room and raise them carefully so as not to scare the ceiling. The baffles are only attached at the top and bottom as mentioned in photo 8, so the screw heads will be covered by other components later. Once the baffle is secured to the bracket, screw the brackets to the baffles 10 inches above and below the back wall as shown in photo 9. Use the brackets to attach the baffles perpendicular to the back wall. Once the partition is perfectly aligned, screw the brackets into the opening in the ceiling then into the floor bracket.

Install guardrails to hold bars, soffit channels and supports in place

Before screwing the spacers (P) between the deflectors, screw a 1×2 spacer (N1 and N2) to the back of every 3/4”. From bottom to top. Then attach the corresponding wall rails parallel to the screw-in brackets on the back wall. To complete the top of each section, cut the R soffit pieces and nail them to the bars.

Screw the 1×2 strips (U1) to the bottom of the baffles and make the center floor support (V) from scrap plywood to support the base shelves below (image 15). If you have an underfloor heating register, remove the cover and install an expansion starter (image 17).

The make-up of plain boxes with matching contours makes all the difference

Photo 10: Fixing nets, racks and racks
Cut the threads (Q1 to Q4) on a table saw. Sand each piece (100 grit) to soften sharp edges. Cut and nail each piece in place with a small nail gun. Glue and nail brackets (K) under pad and fillet. Cut the bottom basket support plates (S), center them under the basket and netting, then glue and nail them to the sides of the bulkhead with a pneumatic nail gun.Photo 11: Cut face frame
Cut the tops of each face frame 5-1/2″. From the top to make room for the column nets (Q4). Make the cuts perfectly square.Photo 12: Adding the rest of the face frame
Evenly center the face frames on the front of the partitions, then glue and nail them to the plywood front panels. Glue the netting (Q4) in place, then glue and nail the top of the front frame to the top of the baffle.Photo 13: More crown molding
Cut and nail the crown to complete the longitudinal joints of the ceiling. Cut and glue small pieces of wood to fill the gaps in the face of each baffle behind the face frame.Photo 14: Tips for casting crowns
Cut your crown molding more safely and accurately by positioning the die upside down on the table saw. Mark the pieces so you can see the mark and slowly cut through the piece. Let the saw fall through the die. Do not force the saw or rush to cut.Photo 15: Assembly of the molded base and spacers
Cut and nail the base mold to wrap around the face frame and side deflectors. Note that you will need small fillets to fill in the gaps the same way you did on the top under the crown molding return. Screw (U) 6-1/4 inches from the ground on the side of each deflector. Also screw the floor glides (V) into the floor to support the center of each base shelf (R).

Start by nailing the tenderloin meat (Q1 and Q2) to the bottom of the cushion. The tenderloin is wider than the steak, so line it up in the center so it extends across the front and back of the steak as well. Next, glue each bracket (K) to the face of the baffle and nail it to the baffle and netting above. Continue on the side continuing with the small net (Q3). Glue this small piece to the bottom of the bracket with carpenter’s glue. Cut the frame support to fit snugly between the netting and the ground to support the curved frame. These shelves are designed to interlock the shelves and hide the gaps between the ends of the shelves and the faces of the partitions. Cut the center seat (Photo 17) and install the supports and nets underneath as shown in Figure A (seat height is 22”).

Cut the front frames of the partitions as shown in Photo 11 and attach them to the partitions. Note that the plywood face of the partition will become the base of the face frame. It is not necessary to fit tightly to the ceiling as the crown molding will cover the ceiling seam and exposed screws along the top of the panel.

Crown casting can be tricky, so purchase an extra piece of mold (you can always return the unused piece). Small pieces can be a bit tricky if the ceiling is uneven. It is important to cut the pieces evenly. Draw a line just above the groove of your miter saw and always align the edge of the die with the saw blade. Small gaps at joints can be filled with putty and sand, so don’t force yourself to strive for perfection against a ceiling that has none. Do not bother handling the crowns (Photo 13), as they will be difficult to mount; replace them.

Install the base and create a secret compartment

Photo 16: Building a Secret Dashboard
Assemble the “removable” secret panel base to create a secret storage box under the base shelf. Hold the base plate in place with a magnetic pin securely attached to the side of the bracket (V).How to open the control panel
Open your secret chest by opening it with a pocket knife or paring knife.Photo 17: Installation of a seat near the window
Assemble the window seats by screwing (U2) into the edges of each center baffle, then nailing the seats into the slots. Note: The seat is reinforced underneath with front and rear supports which are glued under the seat before being nailed in place. Glue the front of the chair, then nail the seat frame and netting in place, as shown in figure A.

This project will tie in better with the rest of the room if you replace your existing baseplate and transfer it to the bottom of the bookcase. We made a two-piece sole with a 1×6 limit with a double stop for the upper limb. To create a small gap between the two base pieces (Image 16 and Figure A), we chamfer the top edge of the 1×6 and the bottom edge of the coupler stop slightly with a solid plane. This creates a traditional custom molded look.

To create secret compartments, cut approximately 12 in. blocks and glue them to the back of the base 1×6 pieces and nail the die stopper to the blocks (see Figure A). Glue a pair of small blocks to the back of the S pieces to create a stop for the secret plates. Attach the magnetic cabinet latch to the center base bracket (V) to hold the cabinet secretly in place.

Fill all nail holes, then sand and finish the bookcase

Sand the bookcase with 100 grit, then 150 grit sandpaper. Paint the bookcase if desired or create that beautiful vintage finish we created. We use gel dye and mix five parts cherry to two parts red mahogany with one part specialty walnut. Mix them in a separate container and apply to the sanded surface with a clean cloth. Apply enough to cover and remove excess after a few minutes. Gently remove the stain just enough to bring out the grit of the grain. The dry brush removes excess dirt from the corners. You can rub a little harder if you want to reveal highlights or simulate wear. Let the stain dry and finish the piece of furniture with two coats of polyurethane varnish.

More information

  • Figure A: Library detail
  • Cutting list
  • Shopping list

Tools needed for this project

Have the tools you need for this DIY project ready before you start – it’ll save you time and frustration.

  • Compressor
  • gas line
  • Brad nail gun
  • welding gun
  • Circular saw
  • cordless drill
  • Square frame
  • Puzzle
  • Level
  • Miter saw
  • Orbital Crusher
  • Protective glasses
  • speed square
  • saw table

More information

Similar projects
How to make a DIY bookshelfBookcase and shelving tipsHow to build a bookcaseHow to build a bookshelfSecret bookHow to cut waterproof Dado and Rabbet

Popular questions about how to build a built in bookcase into a wall

How do you build a bookshelf in a wall?

How do you turn a bookshelf into a built-in?

  1. Step 1: Screw the bookcases together. Assemble bookcases if needed. …
  2. Step 2: Cut trim for bookcases. …
  3. Step 3: Attach the smaller trim. …
  4. Step 4: Nail the larger trim. …
  5. Step 5: Touch up and decorate built-ins.

How do you build a recessed built-in bookshelf?

How do you build a floating bookshelf wall?

What can I use for the back of a bookcase?

DIY Bookshelf Backing Supplies

Foam Board (I get mine at the Dollar Tree!) You’ll need enough foam board to fill the back of each shelf. For fabric, you’ll need the size of back you want to cover, plus 3-4″. So if your shelf back is 10 x 28, your fabric would need to be 13×31.

How do you make a freestanding bookshelf?

How do you fill a gap between a bookcase and a wall?

  1. Step 1: Scribe and Cut Trim Board. Scribe a board to fit over any irregularities and cut to length. …
  2. Step 2: Fasten Scribed Board. Fasten the scribed board to the bookcase using screws. …
  3. Step 3: Fill gaps with Caulk. Fill any gaps between the scribed board and the wall or bookcase with caulk for a clean finish.

Does a built in bookcase need a back?

All cabinets should have a back that rests in rabbets in the sides of the case. This ensure a tight fit between the back and sides.

Should built-ins go all the way to the ceiling?

Go Floor-to-Ceiling.

However, some built-ins can be slightly shorter than ceiling height or have one or both ends exposed. But your piece will look much more “built in” if the cabinetry fills the entire wall.

How do you build recessed shelves in a wall?

How much does it cost to have built in bookshelves?

The cost to have built-in bookshelves installed averages $2,769 or between $1,299 and $4,262 for a carpenter to do the job. If you buy the materials yourself, you can usually get a handyman to install them for $30 to $130 per hour. For high end custom work, expect to spend $150 to $1,200 per linear foot.

What is niche wall?

A wall niche is basically a decorative box nested inside a wall of your home. People love them because they’re fully customizable, and they offer a creative way to squeeze in some extra storage out of a blank wall. But not all niches have to be functional, and in fact many are purely decorative.

How much weight can floating shelves hold?

The amount of weight your floating shelf can hold depends on where you hang it and how big your floating shelf is. Shelves with the lowest weight capacity can’t hold more than 25 pounds, but the sturdiest shelves can hold up to 100 pounds or more.

How do you install floating shelves without brackets?

What type of wood is used for floating shelves?

Best Wood for Floating Shelves

The best wood is any hardwood like solid walnut, oak, pine, maple or mahogany to name a few. Rough cut wood is more raw and will show some impurities. Finished or unfinished? some floating shelves will come finished with a stain or clear coat and some will come unfinished and paintable.

Video tutorials about how to build a built in bookcase into a wall

keywords:

keywords: #landtohouse, #landtwohouse, #bookcase, #book, #case, #build, #bookshelf, #shelf, #construction, #howto, #howtomake, #howtobuild, #books, #library

This is the first step in building a full wall bookcase. In this video I show how I make the rough shelves. The next part will show the trim build and install.

Part 2: Build a bookcase

-https://youtu.be/EZQ84l5V-Bg

Check out the Clamps:

-http://amzn.to/2iT4dsZ

Check out the Pocket Hole Jig:

-http://amzn.to/2iqoGS9

Help Support land To House by Amazon:

-http://amzn.to/2hGup9u

Check out the Land To House website:

-http://www.landtohouse.com

Send Mail to Land To House:

Land To House llc

P.O. Box 323

Micaville, NC 28755

See whats coming up before it hits Youtube on my Facebook Page:

-https://www.facebook.com/LandToHouse

Land To house is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a way for websites to earn advertising revenues by advertising and linking to Amazon.com

keywords: #bookcasedoor, #bookcasebuild, #bookcasedecorideas, #bookcaseideas, #howtobuildacustomwallunit, #howtobuildabuiltinwallunit, #howtobuildawalldeskunit, #howtobuildawallunitbookcase, #buildstrongbookcases, #shelvesonthewall, #shelvesideas, #shelvesonthewallideas, #shelvesdesign, #howtobuildabookcasewall, #howtobuildabookcasewallunit, #officefurnituredesignideas, #officefurnitureinstallation, #officefurnituredesign, #officefurnitureideas

All of us will have wood working projects with special challenges. This video addresses a challenge I faced in a recent office bookcase build.

See how I solved my problem with a unique corbel application that added the needed support for tall bookcases.

keywords: #Built-inbookcases, #builtinbookcases, #diybookcases, #diybuilt-ins, #built-indesk, #builtindesk., #floortoceilingbookcases, #howtobuildbookcases, #fullwallbookcases, #bookcase, #builtins, #built-ins, #woodworking, #woodworkingprojects, #diy, #howto, #diyproject, #fixthisbuildthat, #fixthisbuildthat, #ftbt

Transform your room with built-in bookcases and a desk for tons of storage

Thanks to Woodcraft

-http://bit.ly/2qP7JIs

GET THE PLANS:

-https://fixthisbuildthat.com/builtinbookcaseplans

🎥 What to Watch Next:

Lower Wall Wainscoting Install –

-https://youtu.be/k_LCy1_2xZ8

How to Instal Vinyl Plank Flooring –

-https://youtu.be/6KEthELQfro

How to Tile a Small Bathroom Floor –

-https://youtu.be/JtqwYrJNCbI

➤Join the Builders Club!!!

-http://bit.ly/2abkaSV

More content, early access, FREE plans, video credits

➤Support the FTBT Channel:

Buy FTBT Woodworking Plans:

-http://bit.ly/2fL5NGp

Buy FTBT Merch:

-https://bit.ly/2YgiHnd

Links to My Tools \u0026 Gear:

-http://bit.ly/FTBT-tools

Subscribe:

-http://bit.ly/FTBT-youtube

➤Thank you to these partners for supporting my channel. Go check them out!

Woodcraft:

-http://bit.ly/2qP7JIs

Kreg Tool:

-https://amzn.to/2FXZIGp

ISOtunes:

-http://bit.ly/2Ru4Es8

TimberlandPRO:

-https://bit.ly/2Zm1r1n

➤Plans from this build:

Built-in Bookcase with Integrated Desk –

-https://fixthisbuildthat.com/builtinbookcaseplans

Modular Garage Cabinets bundle (Save 30%) –

-https://fixthisbuildthat.com/garagecabinets

Mobile Lumber Cart –

-https://fixthisbuildthat.com/mobilewoodcartplans

➤Tools/Supplies Used (affiliate):

Scotch Delicate Surface Painter’s Tape –

-https://bit.ly/3x0jetD

ScotchBlue Original Painter’s Tape –

-https://bit.ly/3h0H3La

ScotchBlue Sharp Lines Painter’s Tape –

-https://bit.ly/3gWo1H3

Kreg Foreman –

-http://bit.ly/2RZNcwr

Parallel Clamps –

-https://bit.ly/3y6k0Fm

Kreg Track Saw –

-http://bit.ly/36eW6u0

Kreg Foreman –

-http://bit.ly/2RZNcwr

Kreg Corner Clamp –

-https://bit.ly/3sGSY6q

Mirka Deros Sander –

-http://bit.ly/35DrMbj

Gorilla Gripper Plywood Handler –

-https://bit.ly/3cHrGoj

Parallel Clamps –

-https://bit.ly/3y6k0Fm

Cordless Brad Nailer –

-https://amzn.to/3h1L5D0

Baseboard Puller –

-https://amzn.to/3wZg3Cn

6’ Level –

-https://amzn.to/3x1zDOG

Cut-in brush –

-https://amzn.to/2UG7zC4

Scraper Holder Thingy –

-https://amzn.to/2T9X5dN

ISOtunes Bluetooth Hearing Protection –

-http://bit.ly/2Ru4Es8

➤FOLLOW ME on Social Media:

Instagram –

-http://www.instagram.com/fixthisbuildthat

Facebook –

-http://www.fb.com/ibuildthat

Twitter –

-http://www.twitter.com/fixthisbuildtht

Pinterest –

-http://www.pinterest.com/fixthisbuildtht

See more articles in category: FAQS